Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Fig 3.8

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xvi

In August 2009, my sister, Clare Luz, a faculty member in the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, was asked by a colleague to organize a public panel on arts and healing in conjunction with ArtPrize in Grand Rapids, Michigan.1 Since Clare had long been interested in the intersection of arts, health, and medicine, she agreed to do a presentation. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xii-xxii

Many individuals and organizations contributed to the development of this publication, and we are grateful for their interest in and support of this endeavor. First we want to acknowledge individuals who shared images, stories, and information about quilts they made or owned and who led us to stories, reference, artists, funding, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

Quilts substantially contribute to health and well-being.1 The number of health-related quilts made is in the millions.2 Name an illness, medical condition, or disease and you will likely find quiltmaking associated with it. From Alzheimer’s disease, to irritable bowel syndrome, to Lou Gehrig’s disease, to Crigler-Najjar syndrome, ...

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one • Evidence of the Impact of Quilts and Quiltmaking on Health and Health-Care Outcomes

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pp. 7-17

Literature on the association between quilts, quiltmaking, well-being, health, and health-care outcomes is still sparse. The majority of scholarly studies lack rigorous scientific research designs or deep humanistic investigation. There are few that have used randomized control groups, representative samples, ...

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two • The Art of Health-Related Quiltmaking

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pp. 18-47

The production techniques and designs used by quilt artists in their work associated with health and well-being are as varied as the individuals who make them. There are, however, certain materials, patterns, motifs, color palettes, and techniques that are closely connected to quilts and the experience of illness, healing, and well-being. ...

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three • Individual Experiences of Health and Well-being through Quiltmaking

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pp. 48-110

“When life throws you scraps, make quilts,” “Our lives are like quilts—bits and pieces, joy and sorrow, stitched with love,” and “Those who sleep under a quilt, sleep under a blanket of love.”1 These proverbs reflect the motivations of so many who turn to making and using quilts for personal well-being and healing. ...

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four • Public and Collective Quiltmaking for Health and Well-being

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pp. 111-152

Thousands of quiltmakers—whether as individuals or as members of quilt guilds or faith-based organizations—have joined with others to make what is broadly termed “charity” or “service quilts” to provide material and emotional comfort to those in need and to raise awareness about or funds for causes, including those related to health ...

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five • Quilts in Healing Environments and Clinical Care

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pp. 153-182

One goal of this book is to describe the many ways quilts and quiltmaking are being used in relation to health—from raising public awareness, as in the example of the national AIDS quilt, to comforting victims of war and natural disaster. In chapter 3 we provided empirical evidence of the association between art and positive, ...

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six • Conclusion

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pp. 183-184

Our goal with this book was to raise awareness of the massive realm of health-related quilts and start to make sense of it. We have introduced one way of organizing and understanding its depth, breadth, meaning, and impact on the multiple facets of good health, well-being, and quality of life for not only the quiltmakers but also the recipients, users, and viewers of their works of art. It is just a beginning. ...

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Afterword

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pp. 185-186

In mid-September 2012, Betty MacDowell was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and within two weeks she was transferred to a hospital hospice room. There, surrounded by her husband, children, and close family, she was covered in two family quilts—one made by her maternal grandmother as a present for her wedding and the other pieced by ...

Appendix: Guide to Whatever It Takes: An Ovarian Cancer Diary

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pp. 187-190

Bibliography

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pp. 191-208

Index

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pp. 209-218

About the Authors

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