Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

Contributors

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pp. ix-xviii

Tables

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pp. xix-xx

Acronyms

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pp. xxi-xxii

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Foreword

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pp. xxiii-xxvi

The thirteen chapters in this book highlight the importance of universities as centres for the generation of knowledge, trainers of skilled workers and creators of the next generation of thinkers. They also emphasise the uniqueness of a university. A university is a multidisciplinary institution that gives space for the search and transmission of all knowledge. ...

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Preface and Acknowledgements

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pp. xxvii-xxx

Founded in 1922 as a technical college enrolling 14 day students of carpentry, building and mechanics, Makerere was started by the British colonial administration in East Africa primarily to address two objectives: produce a middle-level workforce to assist the colonial administration in Eastern Africa and deter completers of secondary of education from seeking higher education ...

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Chapter 1 - Higher Education for Innovation and Development

Haruna Yakubu

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pp. 1-17

Issues at the intersection of higher education, innovation and development might not be topical for much of the developed world because that is what they have been pre-occupied with since the dawn of the industrial age. For them, the relation between science, technology, innovation and higher education has long been well established. ...

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Chapter 2 - Challenges and Opportunities for Quality Assurance of Cross-Border Higher Education in East Africa

Philipo Lonati Sanga

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pp. 18-33

Cross-border higher education (CBHE) “is a multifaceted phenomenon which includes the movement of people (students and faculty), providers (HEIs with a physical and/or virtual presence in a host country), and academic content (such as the development of joint curricula)” ...

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Chapter 3 - William Senteza-Kajubi as a Change Agent in Uganda’s Education System with Specific Reference to Widening Access to University Education

Fred E. K. Bakkabulindi

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pp. 34-50

In this chapter, I examine the life of William Senteza-Kajubi (1926–2012), formerly a Professor of Higher Education, as a change agent in Uganda’s education system. In particular, I highlight his contribution to widening access to university education. ...

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Chapter 4 - Deregulation of Higher Education in Nigeria: A Call for Restraint

A. O. K. Noah, Adesoji A. Oni, Stephen D. Bolaji

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pp. 51-57

Deregulation is a process by which governments remove selected regulations on business in order to encourage operation of the market forces of demand and supply (Wokocha, 2005). It aims at providing a level playing field for businesses, which promotes competitiveness, productivity, efficiency, consumer choice and utility at the most affordable prices. ...

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Chapter 5 - Do Universities in Uganda Satisfy their International Students?

Jude Ssempebwa, Fawz N. Mulumba, Ritah N. Edopu

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pp. 58-69

Traditionally, the vast majority of students studying abroad have moved from developed to developed countries (i.e. North to North) and from less developed to more developed countries (i.e. South to North) (cf. Altbach & Knight, 2007; Altbach, 2006; Brooks & Waters, 2009a; UNESCO Institute of Statistics, 2013). An implicit assumption in both these student flows is that, ...

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Chapter 6 - Attributes of Human Capital Developed by Ugandan Universities and Students’ Post-Graduation Motives

Livingstone Ddungu

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pp. 70-84

Human capital refers to the stock of knowledge and innate and acquired attributes that embody the ability that underlies a person’s productivity (Døving & Nordhaug, 2002). The level at which the human capital developed by a university meets students’ post-graduation motives gives some indication of the degree to which the university equips students with the knowledge ...

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Chapter 7 - The Importance of Research in a University

Mahmood Mamdani

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pp. 85-98

My remarks will be more critical than congratulatory. I will focus more on the challenge we face rather than the progress we have made. My focus will also be limited, to the Humanities and the Social Sciences rather than to the Sciences, to postgraduate education and research rather than to undergraduate education. ...

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Chapter 8 - University Governance and Intellectual Capital at two Universities in Uganda

Karim N. A. Ssesanga

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pp. 99-116

Universities in both developed and budding economies are knowledge-intensive organisations that contain basic operations for knowledge generation, sharing, and transfer. As such, their intellectual capital potential is great. However, only some of them are able to transform this potential into operational intellectual capital. In particular, African universities currently function in very difficult circumstances, ...

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Chapter 9 - Prospective Graduates’ Perception of the Responsiveness of Ethiopian Universities to Contemporary Labour Market Needs

Demewoz Admasu Gebru

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pp. 117-126

Higher education in Ethiopia spans over 1,700 years. However, establishment of the country’s modern higher education system started in 1950. Growing rather slowly until the mid-1990s, the sector has expanded sporadically over the last two decades, moving from elite to mass. From two universities during the early 1990s, the sector has expanded to 35 public universities ...

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Chapter 10 - Challenges of University Governance in Malawi

Lester Brian Shawa

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pp. 127-138

In this chapter, I present two arguments: first, that university governance in Malawi is being negatively affected by the global neoliberal orthodoxy — a market view of citizenship that defines a citizen as an economic maximiser who is governed by self-interest and thus views higher education as a commodity on the market that is to be competed for by those who can afford to buy it ...

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Chapter 11 - Organisational Commitment of Academic Staff at Universities in Uganda

Edith Namutebi, John Baptist Mpoza

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pp. 139-152

Post-independence university education in East Africa started with the metamorphosis in 1963 of Makerere College, hitherto an affiliate of the University of London, into the University of East Africa — headquartered at Makerere Hill in Kampala and with constituent colleges at Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ...

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Chapter 12 - Viability of Open Educational Resources in Open and Distance Learning: Views of Members of the Executive Board of the African Council for Distance Education, Kenya

Vincent Ado Tenebe, Rotimi Ogidan

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pp. 153-160

Nations seek to provide quality education for all their citizens in an equitable and accessible manner. However, for a host of reasons, conventional approaches to educational development and delivery have excluded some groups of people from educational programmes. The need to include these groups in educational programmes has created a need for a radical departure ...

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Chapter 13 - Stereotype Threat and University of Botswana Teacher Trainees’ Attitude towards their Training Programme and Teaching

H. Johnson Nenty, Phuti Fiji, Moyo Sello

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pp. 161-175

Teaching is the first among all nation-building professions. Members of all other professions were ‘built’ or trained by teachers, and yet teaching is among the least rewarded professions, especially when it comes to intrinsic rewards. In status, it is said to be inferior, and to Shaw ...

References

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pp. 176-204

Index

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pp. 205-210

Back Cover

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