Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Mavcor Center info

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

When I was a girl, my mother took pictures, my grandmother saved pictures, and I beheld pictures. Some of my fondest childhood memories are of family nights nestled around the Kodak carousel, transfixed by its metrical click and the earlier versions of my mother’s family festooned in tropical shirts, too-tight athletic uniforms, and goofy grins as they splashed across the screen. ...

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A Note on the Images

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pp. xv-xvi

In 1855, the Spiritual Telegraph ran a story about a man in Indiana who wanted to explain the “wonderful and incontrovertible manifestation of spiritual phenomena” that had recently appeared in a daguerreotype portrait. Daguerreotypes were the first commercial photographs in the United States and had quickly become the nation’s favored form of portraiture ...

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Introduction: A New Testament

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pp. 1-21

Walter Jones was twenty-two years old when he enlisted in Company C of the 8th New York Calvary in the sizzle of late August 1862. As he put his affairs in order and packed the few belongings that he would take with him—a book or two, perhaps, some writing paper, and maybe a small likeness of his wife, Lola—his stepmother, Lucy, gave him a small New Testament to carry with him throughout his service. ...

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1: When I Awake with Thy Likeness

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pp. 22-63

Sometime after James Nash and Mary Sheldon were married at Minersville, Pennsylvania, on July 4, 1868, they purchased a full-gilt New Illustrated Devotional and Practical Polyglot Family Bible in luxurious Turkey morocco binding. By the time they bought their Bible, most likely from a canvassing book agent who would have assured them that the binding ...

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2: Here Is My Name When I Am Dead

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pp. 64-112

In the autumn of 1862, Molly Stilwell waited anxiously for news—any news—from her husband. Twenty-two-year-old William had enlisted in the 53rd Georgia Infantry in May, and as news rolled in of the carnage that had taken place near Antietam Creek in mid-September, Molly’s thoughts drifted to darker and darker prospects for herself and two-year-old John Thomas, ...

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3: Agents of a Fuller Revelation

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pp. 113-157

On a rainy New Year’s Day, 1863, readers of the Daily Evening Telegraph of San Francisco who found themselves skimming through the latest financial reports, war information, and advertisements for sundry elixirs to cure coughs, purify blood, and restore hair may also have noted the birth of a daughter to Philip Quigley, as well as the deaths of three young boys during the preceding week. ...

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4: By Pencil and Camera

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pp. 158-199

In October 1893, sixteen-year-old Ivy Ledbetter Lee stood among the crowd gathered on the elevated rail platform in Chicago. The weather was mild for mid-October—the morning Tribune had forecast a comfortable sixty degrees—but Ivy still had a tingle run down his spine as he thought about what the day had in store. Four days earlier he had left Atlanta with fifty dollars in his pocket and a brown cloth memorandum pad. ...

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5: Beyond the Sense Horizon

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pp. 200-237

On Easter Sunday 1896, wearied from months of travel, the American entrepreneur Elmer Underwood sat down at the desk in his room of the Howard’s Hotel in Jerusalem to write a note to his wife. “My Dear Jennie,” he wrote on the sheet of hotel stationary, “Bert and I are having a grand and interesting time here. I arrived on Good Friday morning and have been seeing and photographing the grand parades and ceremonies.” ...

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Epilogue: How Mr. Eastman Changed the Face of American Religion

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pp. 238-244

On Tuesday, March 20, 1900, the Los Angeles Times ran an inconspicuous advertisement on a crowded page for S. G. Marshutz, an optician and supplier of photographic materials on Spring Street. “We Place on Sale Today a New Eastman Kodak, ‘The Brownie,’ at $1.00 Each.”1 It had been more than a decade since George Eastman, the tinkering banker from Rochester, ...

Notes

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pp. 245-272

Bibliography

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pp. 273-288

Index

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pp. 289-293