Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

The writers and musicians I discuss in this book all experienced significant struggle as well as success in their lives, and I want to begin by acknowledging their inspirational art and activism. I hope that this book succeeds not only in furthering recognition of underappreciated jazz writers and texts but also in celebrating the vitally collaborative dynamic of jazz practice. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-26

In one of the earliest public statements about jazz by an African American musician, renowned band leader James Reese Europe explains the African American sources of jazz and its growing international prominence during World War I. Europe speaks in the wake of the historic contribution of the 369th Infantry Jazz Band, also known as the “Hellfighters Band,” ...

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1. “Harlem Jazzing”: Claude McKay, Home to Harlem, and Jazz Internationalism

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pp. 27-58

The June 1928 issue of The Crisis featured the second installment of Clement Wood’s exposé of United States policy in occupied Haiti. Wood, a white socialist poet who was perhaps best known for his 1926 jazz sequence titled Greenwich Village Blues, was uncompromising in his indictment of the financial motives underlying the occupation ...

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2. “Black Man’s Verse”: The Black Chicago Renaissance and the Popular Front Jazz Poetics of Frank Marshall Davis

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pp. 59-88

When Jake proposes to “go on off to sea again” in order to escape from New York at the conclusion of Claude McKay’s Home to Harlem, Felice asks him bluntly, “‘What you wanta go knocking around them foreign countries again for like swallow come and swallow go from year to year and nevah settling down no place? This heah is you’ country, daddy. ...

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3. “Do You Sing for a Living?”: Ann Petry, The Street, and the Gender Politics of World War II Jazz

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pp. 89-110

About one-third into Ann Petry’s 1946 novel, The Street, after five suffocating chapters of anxiety, frustration, and dread, the novel’s protagonist, Lutie Johnson, decides to escape the drudgery of her everyday life and relax for a moment at the local Junto Bar and Grill. An “oasis of warmth” in the winter (141), an “illusion of coolness” in the summer (142), ...

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4. “Cultural Exchange”: Cold War Jazz and the Political Aesthetics of Langston Hughes’s Long Poems

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pp. 111-130

Langston Hughes is better known than any other African American poet for his inventive adaptations of African American vernacular forms, especially musical forms, from his blues poetry of the 1920s to his ambitious postwar jazz sequences, Montage of a Dream Deferred and Ask Your Mama: 12 Moods for Jazz. Hughes’s poetry is distinctively African American ...

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5. “A Silent Beat in Between the Drums”: Bebop, Post-Bop, and the Black Beat Poetics of Bob Kaufman

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pp. 131-158

Bob Kaufman’s second book of poems, Golden Sardine (1967), concludes with an atypically documentary note, an October 5, 1963, letter to the editor of the San Francisco Chronicle (Cranial Guitar 96–97).1 Immediately following the intensely sensual affirmation of jazz in his “O-JAZZ-O” poems, ...

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Conclusion. “A New Kind of Music”: Paule Marshall, The Fisher King, and the Dissonance of Diaspora

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pp. 159-180

Of the writers who are featured in Jazz Internationalism, Paule Marshall is most often identified with the black Atlantic geography previously associated with Claude McKay. From her first novel, Brown Girl, Brownstones (1959), to her recent memoir, Triangular Road (2009), her writing has addressed the conflicts that divide African diasporic communities and suggested resolutions ...

Notes

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pp. 181-204

Works Cited

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pp. 205-220

Index

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pp. 221-228

About the Author

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Further Series Titles

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