Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

As always, our debts to our colleagues and others loom large. Richard Morgan and Gregory Wegner had the unenviable task of editing what we have written in such a way that we took their suggestions as often as possible. Laura Perna played three roles in the birth of this volume—as a consultant to the research team, as an editor of the Johns Hopkins University Press series in which this volume appears, ...

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Prologue

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pp. 1-6

We finished this book on the eve of Donald Trump’s inauguration as the nation’s forty-fifth president. Like the rest of those involved in American higher education, we duly noted the lamentations and warnings that what would lie ahead for the nation’s colleges and universities was more disruption, wrapped in the rhetoric of acrimony and uncertainty. ...

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1. Market Price

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pp. 7-22

As the Walrus in Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking Glass knew, it is the sorting out that matters most. In the pages that follow, we have used data drawn from the US Department of Education’s Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) to map American colleges and universities into recognizable clusters, or segments, that facilitate ...

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2. Sectors and Segments

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pp. 23-37

Today’s higher education landscape is dominated by a market that has both sharp edges and critical differences. To describe the roles that sectors and segments play in this shaping of the American undergraduate enterprise, we have developed what might best be called a graphical lexicon—quite literally a graphic vocabulary—for depicting the market ...

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3. Student Consumers

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pp. 38-50

The small article by Beckie Supiano (2014) was almost lost among the torrent of comment stirred up by a White House determined to make colleges and universities more responsive to consumer demands. What distinguished this piece was its quiet skepticism, a willingness to ask unanswered questions, and a fundamental doubt about whether the market for undergraduate education ...

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4. Jobs

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pp. 51-65

The new gold standard for a college education is the assurance upon graduation of not just a job, but a well-paying job, one capable of generating sufficient income to allow a recent graduate to pay off the loans that helped underwrite the cost of his or her baccalaureate degree. What students and their parents—especially their parents—want to know is what ...

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5. Fifty States

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pp. 66-84

Thirty years ago, Bruce Johnstone, a member of the original Pew Higher Education Roundtable and chancellor of the State University of New York (SUNY), declared that there was no United States system of higher education—no minister, as in Europe; no truly ministerial functions; but, rather, a lightly regarded Department of Education that naturally ...

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6. Faculty

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pp. 85-99

In our earlier chapters, we explored the ways in which institutions varied across market segments economically and culturally—in terms of market price, student demographics, student attendance patterns, and curricular offerings. Now we ask how faculty characteristics play out in this segmented enterprise. We do so in a time of changing roles ...

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7. Knowing the Territory

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pp. 100-117

We have filled the pages of this volume with the contours of the US market for an undergraduate education. It is a market so highly segmented that differences between and among individual institutions are minimized, while difference across the four sectors (and their various segments) have become more pronounced. States matter, though, ironically, what is most ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 118-126

What those who would reform, if not actually remake, American higher education now confront is a market landscape that is as tough as it is unforgiving. There are too few resources, too many constituencies expecting to be served, and too little certainty as to what constitutes a quality product. Public institutions, in particular, are being shaped by churlish politicians no longer willing to see higher education as a public good. ...

References

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pp. 127-130

Index

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pp. 131-138