Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

I am above all indebted to a number of Bandung-based preachers who allowed me to accompany them as they fulfilled their invitations, and who were generous in sharing their experiences and perceptions about Islamic oratory with me. Jujun Junaedi and Miftah Faridl were outstanding among these people, and to both of them I am very grateful. ...

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Note on Transcription

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pp. xiii-xiv

This book cites and reproduces writings and speech in Indonesian, Sundanese, Arabic, and English. In accordance with accepted Sundanese and Indonesian usage, I have marked the mid-front, unrounded vowel as é in Sundanese examples but have not differentiated the equivalent vowel in Indonesian examples. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-29

One afternoon in September 2009 I left Bandung, the capital city of Indonesia’s West Java province, for a ninety-minute car journey to a village in the regional center of Sumedang, east of the city. There were three other men in the car, all of them lecturers in the Faculty of Dakwah ...

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1. Preaching Diversity in Bandung

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pp. 30-45

My experience among Bandung’s Muslims brought me into contact with several conceptions of oratory’s function and practice. On some points, all these understandings meet, sharing certain general assumptions. For example, all West Javanese Muslims would support the general proposition that Islamic oratory’s function is to communicate religious knowledge to Muslims ...

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2. The Unique Voice . . . and Its Travails

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pp. 46-66

My fieldwork in Bandung consisted, for the most part, of accompanying preachers as they fulfilled their engagements. I frequently accompanied Kyai Haji Al-Jauhari, who was at the time of my fieldwork (and is still at the time of writing) the most popular preacher among West Javanese village audiences. ...

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3. Preaching “without Performing”

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pp. 67-85

During the time that I was traveling with Al-Jauhari in 2007 and 2009, I regularly attended a routine preaching event called Ji-had: Pengajian Ahad (The Struggle: Sunday Study). This event, held every Sunday morning at seven o’clock, is organized by PERSIS. The preachers addressing the crowds at this gathering are all PERSIS leaders, ...

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4. The Languages of Preaching in the Islamic Public Sphere

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pp. 86-100

In the two preceding chapters, I flagged two issues that remain unresolved. The first concerns language selection. When Al-Jauhari preaches at celebrations held by Sundanese communities, he generally speaks in Sundanese. In the Sunday sessions, Shiddiq Amien chose Indonesian as the dominant language, even though his audience was almost all Sundanese. ...

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5. The Listening Audience Laughs and Cries, the Writing Public Thinks

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pp. 101-115

In the preceding chapters I have used the term audience to refer to the people gathering to hear the sermons of Al-Jauhari and Shiddiq Amien. I have used the word in the common sense of an assemblage of people listening to orations. In the broader contexts into which this discussion is being directed, however, the term has potential meanings that cannot be easily ignored. ...

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6. A Feminized Domain

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pp. 116-136

Acep Hidayat’s vision is underpinned by three assumptions about contemporary Muslim subjectivity and media. First, Muslims’ engagement with Islamic media should be dedicated to the goals of social and political progress. A second assumption is that individual subjects can and should be transformed into the rational-critical subjects implicit in the idea of democratic citizenship. ...

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7. Public Contest and the Pragmatics of Performance

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pp. 137-150

I started my field research in July 2007 by asking colleagues in Bandung for the names of the city’s most prominent preachers and seeking introductions to them. If a preacher was agreeable, I traveled with him as he performed his engagements, familiarizing myself with his style and the environments in which he was invited to speak. At the same time, ...

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8. Standing Up for Listening

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pp. 151-162

The Indonesian public Islamic sphere is not dominated by modernists. The preceding chapters might have given this impression, giving close attention to a largely modernist critique that argues that Islamic communications should enable Muslims to move beyond their existing realities. In fact, there is considerable support in Indonesia for an Islamic view ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 163-174

Connections between forms of Islamic communication and public spheres have for good reason been the object of scholarly attention in recent years.1 Preaching events are significant among forms of Islamic communication because they draw mass participation to mediations of symbols and ideas held in the highest regard by Muslim listeners. ...

Appendixes

A. Wedding Sermon by Al-Jauhari

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pp. 175-200

B. Sunday Study Sermon by Shiddiq Amien

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pp. 201-215

C. Translation of Excerpt of Sermon by A. F. Ghazali

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pp. 216-220

Notes

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pp. 221-236

Works Cited

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pp. 237-252

Index

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pp. 253-258