Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Series Preface

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pp. vii-ix

The New Hong Kong cinema came into existence under very special circumstances, during a period of social and political crisis resulting in a change of cultural paradigms. Such critical moments have produced the cinematic achievements of the early Soviet cinema, neorealism, the "nouvelle vague," the German cinema in the 1970s ...

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Acknowledgments

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p. xi

I would like to thank Flo Chan and Davina To for their assistance in ferreting out reviews, articles and doing the odd bits of translation for me, Gina Marchetti for her encouragement and her insightful comments on the manuscript, Patrick Mok of the Centre for Cultural Policy Research at the University of Hong Kong for ...

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1.Introduction

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pp. 1-10

Durian Durian is not the film one immediately thinks of when the name of Hong Kong film director Fruit Chan is brought up. The stunning success, both locally and internationally, of his low-budget debut as an independent director, Made in Hong Kong, has ensured that Chan's reputation will always be tied to that film. ...

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2.Contexts: Independent Filmmaking and Hong Kong Cinema

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pp. 11-24

As film scholar Stephen Teo acknowledges, when the rest of the world thinks of Hong Kong cinema it is the kungfu genre, with its crowd-pleasing action sequences and B-movie implications, which first comes to mind (Hong Kong Cinema, 137). The Hong Kong film industry however is more diversified than this stereotyped picture. It does not limit itself to the kungfu genre, but also produces other ...

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3.Contexts: Social Realism in Hong Kong Cinema

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pp. 25-41

While he does concede a few lines later that Hong Kong movies do 'draw their material from and reflect certain social phenomena and actual situations' (15), Sek Kei is nonetheless insistent that this interest in Hong Kong's social reality is merely a device, a ploy to entertain local audiences. He contends that Hong Kong cinema is ...

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4.The Representation of the Mainland Chinese Woman in Durian Durian

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pp. 43-57

A film of two parts, two locations, with two protagonists, Durian Durian as a text constantly draws our attention to parallels, oppositions, counterpoints. The illegal stay of the young Shenzhen girl Fan in Hong Kong parallels that of Yan, the Mainland prostitute. The second half of the film, set in the white, frozen landscapes of ...

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5.Durian Adrift: The Contiguities of Identity in Durian Durian

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pp. 59-80

The literal translation of the Chinese title of Chan's film would be 'durian adrift' or 'floating durian'. The notion of drifting or being afloat is apt for a film that portrays the life of unsettled Mainland illegal immigrants, while the choice of the durian is interesting because this highly contradictory fruit is a symbol of ambivalence ...

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6.The Prostitute Trilogy So Far

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pp. 81-89

In an interview with HK iMail when Durian Durian was released, Chan revealed that he was already working on the second film in a projected Prostitute Trilogy and even suggested that the third installment would be the most ambitious, examining the lives of Mainland prostitutes abroad.1 A topic stumbled upon while filming ...

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7.Conclusion

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pp. 91-96

The significance of Durian Durian lies in its beginning of the work of imagining convergence. By looking through the eyes of the Mainland Other, Chan's film attempts to build contiguities and tenuous kinships, exploring what 'one country, two systems' may actually look and feel like. Full of parallelisms that palimpsestically ...

Notes

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pp. 97-101

Filmography

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pp. 103-105

Bibliography

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pp. 107-112