In this Book

summary

Given the vast inventory of verbal and visual images of nonhuman animals—pigs, dogs, vermin, rodents, apes disseminated for millennia to debase, dehumanize, and justify the persecution of Jews, Bestiarium Judaicum asks: What is at play when Jewish-identified writers tell animal stories?

Focusing on the nonhuman-animal constructions of primarily Germanophone authors, including Sigmund Freud, Heinrich Heine, Franz Kafka, and Gertrud Kolmar, Jay Geller expands his earlier examinations (On Freud’s Jewish Body: Mitigating Circumcisions and The Other Jewish Question: Identifying the Jew and Making Sense of Modernity) of how such writers drew upon representations of Jewish corporeality in order to work through their particular situations in Gentile modernity. From Heine’s ironic lizards to Kafka’s Red Peter and Siodmak’s Wolf Man, Bestiarium Judaicum brings together Jewish cultural studies and critical animal studies to ferret out these writers’ engagement with the bestial answers upon which the Jewish and animal questions converged and by which varieties of the species “Jew” were identified.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Half Title, Title Page, Copyright
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. List of Abbreviations
  2. pp. vii-x
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction. A Field Guide to the Bestiarium Judaicum
  2. pp. 1-28
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 1. “O beastly Jews”: A Brief History of an (Un)Natural History
  2. pp. 29-56
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. Name that Varmint: From Gregor to Josephine
  2. pp. 57-80
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. (Con)Versions of Cats and Mice and Other Mouse Traps
  2. pp. 81-108
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. “If you could see her through my eyes . . .”: Semitic Simiantics
  2. pp. 109-138
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. Italian Lizards and Literary Politics I: Carrying the Torch and Getting Singed
  2. pp. 139-154
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 6. Italian Lizards and Literary Politics II: Deer I Say It
  2. pp. 155-169
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. The Raw and the Cooked in the Old/New World, or Talk to the Animals
  2. pp. 170-187
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. Dogged by Destiny: “Lupus est homo homini, non homo, quom quails sit non navit”
  2. pp. 188-220
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Afterword. “It’s clear as the light of day”: The Shoah and the Human/Animal Great Divide
  2. pp. 221-232
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 233-236
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 237-340
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. References
  2. pp. 341-384
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 385-404
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780823275618
Related ISBN
9780823275595
MARC Record
OCLC
1005195545
Pages
408
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.