Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xi

Over the many years I have worked on this book, I have incurred many debts. It has been a long and mostly joyful ride made smoother and more enjoyable because of the help and encouragement of family, friends, and colleagues. The book would never have been written, or even envisioned, without the encouragement, the assistance, and the memories of Carol Ann Wetherill Getz. This is her family’s story, and it is because of her it was written....

Wattles-Faunce-Wetherill Family Tree

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pp. xii-xiv

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Prologue: From Plymouth Rock to Creede, Colorado—A Family of Long Memory

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pp. 1-10

In 1741 the enterprising merchants of Plymouth, Massachusetts, decided to build a masonry wharf on top of a rock in the harbor. Hearing of the plan, ninety-five-year-old Elder Thomas Faunce demanded to be carried in his chair down to the harbor, where he proceeded to lecture the townsfolk on the significance of the rock. Onto this rock, he said, the first pilgrims stepped off the Mayflower in 1620, and he knew this because his father and other early settlers had told him this story when he was a young...

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1. Susan and Augustus: Partners for Reform

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pp. 11-50

Sometime in 1834 Susan Elvira Lowe left Oneida County, New York, to travel to Ohio to begin work as a teacher in a school for free blacks in Cincinnati. With her friends Phebe Mathews, Emeline Bishop, and Lucy Wright, Lowe planned to join the cause of abolitionists Theodore Dwight Weld and Augustus Wattles, who were already hard at work helping blacks in Cincinnati. Gilbert Barnes, editor of the Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld, and Sarah Grimké, 1822–1844, wrote that the “Cincinnati...

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2. For Freedom and Equality: The Wattles Family in Kansas

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pp. 51-78

In one of the most dramatic events to occur in “Bleeding Kansas” in the 1850s, abolitionist John Brown led a band of raiders across the border into Missouri, killed a slave owner, and liberated his slaves. Fleeing with the freed slaves back into Kansas, Brown sought refuge at the home of Augustus Wattles. When Brown fell ill, he stayed at the Wattles home, and the Wattles daughters nursed him to health.1 The three Wattles girls made different uses of the story when they were much older. Mary Ann Wattles...

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3. Sarah: The Making of a Feminist Consciousness

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pp. 79-99

Awaiting execution in a Charleston, Virginia, jail in 1859, abolitionist John Brown reflected on the road he had taken to arrive at the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. Acutely aware of his own historical legacy, he presumptuously but correctly assumed that many of those who had helped him along the way would come to see their association with him as a great event in their lives. Brown wanted to acknowledge some of the debts he had incurred and repay them by enveloping those privileged individuals...

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4. The Wattles Family in the Civil War, Part I: A Scattered Home Front

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pp. 100-133

For fourteen-year-old Mary Ann Wattles the summer of 1860 began in disappointment. “Our bathing place is all dried up,” she wrote her older sister Sarah; “not a single drop of water left in it.” It was still May, but already it was a “rawful hot day” and she felt “like a ‘sack.’”1 By early July she reported “some of the hottest weather” she had ever seen, with the thermometer reading 112 degrees Fahrenheit. The day before “the wind came from the south as if it had passed over a bed of live coals.” They had shut the...

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5. The Wattles Family in the Civil War, Part II: Fighting for Union and Memory

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pp. 134-168

Eaton Morse could not bring himself to burden his fiancée, Emma Wattles, with all the gory details of life in the US Army, so when he was wounded, he wrote to her sister Sarah instead. “I am suffering severely from a hurt I got in my left side in the skirmish at Salem,” Eaton told her. Eaton’s unit, the 5th Kansas Cavalry, had marched with General Samuel Curtis into Arkansas in April 1862 and had met fierce Confederate resistance at Batesville, on the White River. For the next few months Union raiding parties fanned...

Photo Gallery

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pp. 169-176

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6. “My Dear Doctor”: The Medical Careers of the Wattles Sisters

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pp. 177-209

In 1878 Dr. Emily Blackwell wrote to her sister Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell about the prospects of the Woman’s Medical College of the New York In- firmary, which they had founded ten years earlier. Emily, who was prone to pessimism and periodic despair, predicted the financial ruin of the school and lamented that she no longer possessed the enthusiasm needed to direct it. The only bright spot she saw was the group of dedicated young women doctors working at the women’s infirmary and teaching...

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7. A Westering Family: The Wattles-Faunces as Settler Colonists

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pp. 210-238

Theodore Wattles must have been suffering from a little cabin fever that day in January 1880 when he “took a notion” to go out for some newspapers. He was spending the winter in a small log cabin, twelve feet by sixteen feet, with three other men on a homestead along the Mancos River, in southwestern Colorado. He set off on snowshoes for the nearest settlement, Parrott City, about fifteen miles away. After a two-day walk, he reached Parrott City, where he spent the night at a friend’s house. Then he...

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8. A Western Identity: The Wetherill Women

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pp. 239-270

Born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1885 and 1887, Eugenia and Hilda Faunce spent the first years of their lives under the tutelage and care of their grandmother, Susan Lowe Wattles, while their mother, Mary Ann Wattles Faunce, went to work as a physician and professor of medicine. Their father, Sylvanus Carroll Faunce, was an artist and a staunch socialist committed to the cause of woman’s suffrage. Eugenia and Hilda could not have known at such a young age that it was a rare experience for little girls like...

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Epilogue

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pp. 271-282

In 2007 I traveled to the Boston area to do research for this book. While there, I went out to Duxbury to look for information on the Faunces. Carroll Faunce’s family was still a bit of a mystery to me. Carol Ann Wetherill Getz told some intriguing stories about the Faunces, saying that her first relative to land on American soil was “a little indentured servant” who came to Plymouth in 1623. The Faunces eventually moved up the shoreline a few miles north to the town of Duxbury, and the Faunces had lived...

Notes

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pp. 283-324

Bibliography

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pp. 325-340

Index

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pp. 341-353

Back Cover

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