Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Table of Contents

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pp. vi-viii

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1. The Unique Story of the Suburban African American

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pp. 1-29

To say that African Americans have had a tumultuous history in the United States would be an understatement. Even before the founding of the republic, being black meant your labor was not your own and your body could be assaulted with impunity. Even with the end of chattel slavery, mainstream society (the government and individuals) denied blacks access to the political and social structure of the country by both law and practice. It may be just as much of an understatement to say blacks have not made tremendous social and economic...

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2. How Suburban African Americans Fit into Our Social Science Theories

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pp. 30-75

This chapter will lay out the theoretical foundation for the arguments presented in the remainder of the book. There are many robust literatures that are related to the theory, but which were not specifically crafted toward suburban African Americans. The extant research examines identity, residential status, social network minority status, and group-based political behavior. However, none of this scholarship deals with the confluence of all these things in one population. This chapter will attempt to pull together all of these disparate literatures...

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3. Suburban African Americans and Social Networks

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pp. 76-100

This chapter focuses on the effect of majority white social networks on political motivations and decision making of suburban African Americans. If the majority of white respondents in majority white social networks have a more conservative racial ideology, one should not expect a group-conscious African American in the network to receive racially reinforcing information. This disagreement in the network could cause these individuals to seek out majority African American networks. Indeed, the data show that racialized opinions are...

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4. Suburban African American Ideology and Perception of the Cultural Community

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pp. 101-122

The preceding chapter showed why suburban African Americans might consider some social networks hostile, or at least expect that proffered information will go against their preferences. African Americans in majority white networks interact with peers who hold vastly different views on race, trust in government institutions, church experiences, political ideologies, and feelings about group-based participation. Their opinions and behaviors more closely resemble those of their coethnics in majority black networks. Suburban African Americans...

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5. The Suburban Political Environment and Its Effects on the Participation of Suburban African Americans

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pp. 123-139

The previous chapters laid the foundation for how suburban African Americans come to their participation decisions. Suburban residence is a gift and a curse. On the positive side, these residents have the tangible benefits of nicer schools, manicured lawns, and attentive social services. Yet psychologically, they are in a neighborhood environment with a history of hostility to their presence and which lacks institutions that reinforce their racial identity. There is a certain duality to their political environment as well. On balance, suburban...

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6. Conclusion

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pp. 140-146

The data have shown that suburban African Americans truly do live in a unique environment. Their opinions and political behaviors are not in line with those of their white neighbors and coworkers—people they spend the most time with and with whom they have similar SES. Instead, they appear to adhere to group-conscious norms. In addition to the differences based on race, there is also an interesting separation between suburban African Americans with strong racial identities and suburban African Americans who do...

Appendix

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pp. 147-180

Notes

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pp. 181-186

Bibliography

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pp. 187-194

Index

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pp. 195-207

Back Cover

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