Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

Nancy J. Turner

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pp. vii-x

This book is a product of love and respect, of dedication and commitment, of recognition and attention to history, people, and environment. Each detail it contains, each plant described, each name in the three Native American languages, is a gift—a crystal or a nugget—lovingly recorded and treasured as a component in a rich system of knowledge. ...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xiii

The coast of southern Oregon is a botanically rich region; some plants found here are thought of as more part of the Siskiyou or northern California flora, mixed with the flora of the Pacific Northwest. Growing up in Coos Bay, I was unaware of my home’s interesting botanical ecology, ...

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How to Use This Book

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p. xiv

The scientific names and family classifications of species are taken from the Oregon State University Herbarium database, current in April 2014. Common names are also drawn from the herbarium and the northwestern plant guides Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast by Jim Pojar ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

This book would not have been possible without the inspiration and help of so many people. My dad, Don Whereat, has been a great inspiration in all his work studying Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw history and culture. We spent many fun times as a family picking berries, crabbing, and clamming, and he taught me so many things. ...

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Chapter 1. Indigenous Languages

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pp. 1-4

Since this book lists the native names of the plants in the indigenous languages of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw, a discussion of the native languages is necessary. On Coos Bay, two languages were spoken. Milluk was spoken by people living at Cape Arago, South Slough, and lower Coos Bay, and also by the Nasomah (Lower Coquille) people ...

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Chapter 2. Cultural Background and History

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pp. 5-14

The Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw peoples shared many cultural traits. These tribes have a long history of trading and intermarrying. The principal villages were concentrated on the estuaries and coast, but there were also small villages upriver above tidewater. People from the coast and lower estuaries moved upriver seasonally to fish for salmon ...

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Chapter 3. The Ethnographers and Their Informants

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pp. 15-18

There were few ethnographers who worked with the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw peoples in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and they worked with even fewer informants. Not many of these ethnographers took much of an interest in ethnobotany. One notable exception was James Owen Dorsey, who worked at the Siletz Reservation in 1884. ...

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Chapter 4. Plants and the Traditional Culture

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pp. 19-26

The Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw territory is in the southern Pacific Northwest region. It stretches in the north from Tenmile Creek near the border between Lincoln and Lane Counties, south to Whiskey Run Creek just to the north of the Coquille River, and east to the summit of the Coast Range. ...

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Chapter 5. Trees

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pp. 27-48

Plant description: Betulaceae, birch family. Red alder is a deciduous broad-leaved tree that is very common in moist environments along stream banks and floodplains in western Oregon (although in the Willamette Valley the closely related white alder, ...

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Chapter 6. Shrubs

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pp. 49-72

Plant description: Rosaceae, rose family. Trailing, prickly vines, up to 25 feet long, typically found in burned or logged areas. Vines are dioecious (either male or female); only female vines produce berries. Leaves are alternate and slightly hairy; flowers are small and white; berries ripen in July. ...

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Chapter 7. Forbs

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pp. 73-106

Plant description: Melanthiaceae, bunchflower family; formerly classified in the Liliaceae, lily family, and still identified as such in many general plant guidebooks. Its leaves resemble a tuft of tough grass. Every few years, it blooms, sending up a stalk 3 to 4 feet tall, crowned with a dense cluster of tiny white flowers. ...

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Chapter 8. Ferns, Fern Allies, and Moss

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pp. 107-112

Plant description: Dennstaedtiaceae, bracken family. Tall fern, grows up to 4 feet tall, in partial shade to full sun. Fronds are divided in threes, pinnately compound. ...

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Chapter 9. Fungi and Seaweeds

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pp. 113-114

Plant description: Shelf fungi belong to several families in the phylum Basidiomycota. They all tend to be firm to the touch (although some are soft) and grow in a vague fan shape without stems directly out of logs and snags. ...

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Chapter 10. Unidentified Plants

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pp. 115-120

There are several plants mentioned in various ethnological field notes that are not described in enough detail to identify. ...

Appendix: Basketry

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pp. 121-126

Notes

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pp. 127-134

Bibliography

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pp. 135-142

Index

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pp. 143-147