Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

Many people have supported me along the way of conceptualizing, writing, and finishing this book. It derives from my doctoral dissertation submitted to ETH Zurich in 2015, and I would like to thank my thesis advisers Harald Fischer-Tiné, Tak Fujitani, and Martin Dusinberre for the guidance, encouragement, and constructive critique they off ered me over the years. I am extremely grateful to You Jae Lee at the University of Tübingen, who gently guided me through the early stages of my...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-28

“We did not really want to go to Japan. Every mile toward Japan was a mile farther away from home and our loved ones,” writes Alton Chamberlin, veteran of the U.S. occupation forces in Japan, in his memoirs. “Sometime in September [1945] we pulled into Yokohama, Japan. I was amazed as I looked down from the ship’s rail at the Japanese workers on the pier. They were so tiny! They reminded me of monkeys scurrying around at their assigned tasks.” In his racist sentiments, he “couldn’t...

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1 Comforting the Occupiers: Prostitution as Administrative Practice in Japan at the End of World War II

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pp. 29-77

Beginning on August 16, 1945, one day after Japan’s surrender in World War II, major railway stations in Tokyo such as Ueno and Shinjuku Station were overcrowded with people hastily boarding trains for the countryside. All over the Kantō area, people panicked and were imagining the horrors of what the “American and English devils” (kichiku beiei) might do to them upon their arrival in Japan. Rumors of violent revenge and rape by the foreign troops spread, reinforcing fear among the population...

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2 Security: Policing Prostitution and Venereal Disease in Occupied Japan

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pp. 78-118

On May 10, 1946, journalist and correspondent of the Chicago Sun Mark Gayn escorted Commissioner Lewis J. Valentine of the provost marshal’s office, formerly the police commissioner of the New York Police Department, on an inspection tour of the International Palace. According to Gayn, the International Palace, housed in a former munitions plant in Funabashi at the eastern outskirts of Tokyo, was “the world’s largest brothel.” From the provost marshal’s office in central...

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3 Health: Preventing, Diagnosing, and Treating Venereal Disease

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pp. 119-162

From the very beginning of the occupation period, the occupation regime considered communicable diseases a serious medical problem for the health of occupation personnel. Venereal disease (VD) in particular received major attention, since the occupiers believed, in accord with orientalist stereotypes, that it was especially widespread in Japan and in the Asia Pacific region as a whole. As early as January 1945, Commander Walter H. Schwartz of the U.S. Navy’s Bureau of Medicine Surgery, who...

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4 Morale: Character Guidance and Moral Purification

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pp. 163-216

In a “unique manner,” General William Arthur Beiderlinden wrote in a report from November 1948 to the Character Guidance Council of SCAP’s General Headquarters, the Eighth Army Replacement Training Center in Atsugi, Japan, instructed U.S. servicemen in venereal disease control, sexuality, and hygiene. The center had built a Venereal Disease Museum that consisted of four rooms through which servicemen could tour and attend lectures with charts and posters that outlined the type...

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Epilogue

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pp. 217-224

In 1953, just one year after the official end of the occupation of Japan, Bill Hume, a cartoonist whose pieces appeared in the Navy Times and Pacific Stars & Stripes and who had been stationed in Japan with the U.S. Navy since 1951, published the short booklet Babysan: A Private Look at the Japanese Occupation. The booklet consists of a series of cartoons depicting relationships between American sailors and panpan girls and was dedicated to “all Americans who have visited the land of...

Notes

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pp. 225-268

Bibliography

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pp. 269-290

Index

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pp. 291-300