Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

This precept marks the entrance to the Universidad de San Carlos’s main campus in Zone 12, at the southern edge of Guatemala City. It was delivered by renowned Guatemalan physician, professor, and historian Carlos Martínez Durán during his first tenure as rector of the autonomous university after the 1944 revolution, ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I began this book my first semester of graduate school. I wanted to find a moment when students changed the world. I wound up writing about nationalism, loss, social class, and—yes—many moments when students changed the world. Countless people have nurtured this work and me across a decade. ...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xx

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Introduction: “Do Not Mess with Us!”

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pp. 1-26

Ten o’clock in the morning seemed to be a fine time to start drinking for university students in 1955, at least on Good Friday, about ten months into military rule. A group of two thousand young revelers gathered in front of Lux Theatre on Sixth Avenue in downtown Guatemala City. ...

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1 • The Republic of Students, 1942–1952

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pp. 27-61

Bananas—on the stalk, by the bunch, peeled, held aloft , all of them long Cavendish bananas grown for export by the United Fruit Company (UFCO)—formed the masthead of the No Nos Tientes in 1949. The anonymous artist was probably Mario López Larrave, a law student who drew most of the newspaper’s cheeky cartoons for many decades ...

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2 • Showcase for Democracy, 1953–1957

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pp. 62-97

While members of the Committee of Anticommunist University Students (CEUA) cheered “Dios, Patria y Libertad,” students at the 1955 Huelga de Dolores waved a different banner: “Adiós, Patria y Libertad.” Th e students bade a scathing farewell to the free and democratic nation ...

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3 • A Manner of Feeling, 1958–1962

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pp. 98-127

According to the 1958 No Nos Tientes editorial, Guatemala had enjoyed “frankly wretched luck,” since the counterrevolution. But where previous Huelga de Dolores celebrations saw students considering the temptations of “Soviet Paradise” and “North American gold,” the 1958 editorial was more direct. Its anonymous authors wrote, ...

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4 • Go Forth and Teach All, 1963–1977

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pp. 128-163

Floppy-haired and bespectacled law student Mario López Larrave drew the masthead for the No Nos Tientes in 1966, as he had in 1949 and so many years since. Two restrained and bloodied prisoners formed the letters N in No and Nos. A torture manual, a military cap with the words “Dictatorship Made in the USA” in English across the front, ...

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5 • Combatants for the Common Cause, 1976–1978

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pp. 164-194

In 1976, the No Nos Tientes editorial observed, “In Guatemala, the social faults [fallas] are deeper than the geological faults [fallas].” Faults of both types were very much on the minds of capital city students and their families during the Huelga that year. Just months had passed since a devastating earthquake had wracked Guatemala. ...

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6 • Student Nationalism without a Government, 1977–1980

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pp. 195-228

Despite the promise of reprisal, the Honorable Committee of the Huelga de Dolores printed the No Nos Tientes in 1980. Its editorial warned, “We are in the ultimate moment. Our old enemies, the lackey liberationists, the great landowning bourgeoisie, and the clique of reactionary military men (all faithful servants of Yankee imperialism), ...

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Coda: “Ahí van los estudiantes!” 1980–Present

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pp. 229-240

Today nearly every wall on campus is filled with multicolored figures of sacrifice and struggle. Iconic identification photographs, revolutionary quotations, and the names of classmates and professors who were disappeared during the war greet students as they go from class to class. ...

Notes

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pp. 241-296

Bibliography

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pp. 297-314

Index

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pp. 315-326