Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

In the 1970s, we played Indian: essentially, how to survive in the not-at-all wild South of Austria, feasting on potatoes and franks grilled over a fi re we built in the middle of the forest every day of the summer. For us, war had a lot to do with the almost complete silence of one grandfather and the other’s occasional proclamations that he would never join any party, ...

read more

Introduction: The Vulnerability Hypothesis

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

This is a book about childhood, war, and play. I wrote it to show how children and childhood have been used as technologies to validate, moralize, humanize, and naturalize war and, later, with similar vigor, to sentimentalize peace. Throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, ...

Part I. Playing War

read more

Chapter 1. Field Games

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-58

In the 1732 memoir Tales of Long Gone Times (Hachijūō mukashibanashi) an eighty-year-old man recorded the following about child’s play: “On May 1st, they put up a small flag and lots and lots of children gathered. On the 5th, the children agreed on a place to meet on the 6th. Somewhere between dozens to as many as one hundred children met at the agreed time. ...

read more

Chapter 2. Paper Battles

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-104

War games, played by children under the control and guidance of Japanese school and military authorities, were aggressively encouraged in the name of the twin goals of reversing the effects of modernization and urbanization on children and of preparing them for the demands of nation and empire building. ...

Part II. Picturing War

read more

Chapter 3. The Moral Authority of Innocence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-164

In the previous chapters I examined visual and verbal rhetoric around war games that promoted or questioned the figure of the child as always already a soldier. Beginning with Japan’s victorious wars against China in 1895 and Russia in 1905, a competing figure of the child made a powerful appearance on woodblock prints, a range of illustrations, and photographs: ...

read more

Chapter 4. Queering War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-210

In March 2015, a new animated film became available on the website of the Japanese Ministry of Defense.1 The film, Bōeimon Defense Lecturethe ABC of the Self-Defense Forces (Bōeimon no bōei da mon—yoku wakaru Jieitai), uses an elementary school boy’s question—“What did father do last night?”—as an opener to describe the father’s job as fighter jet pilot ...

read more

Epilogue: The Rule of Babies in Pink

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 211-220

The insidious and varied mechanisms of militarization and militarism have become one of the neatly black-boxed facts of life in many societies ostensibly at peace. This applies whether we consider the weaponization and militarization of, particularly, much of American childhood; the ubiquity of photographs in war reporting around the globe ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-226

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 227-258

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-276