Title Page, Accolades, Endowment Info, Copyright, In Memoriam

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

First and foremost, I offer my deep thanks to all the activists who made the histories I seek to narrate and understand in the pages that follow. Many are named and others are not, but I am deeply grateful to all who have dreamed, built, and struggled through the politics of sexual liberation and radical solidarity. ...

Abbreviations

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pp. xvii-xviii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-16

In March 1988, thousands of lesbian and gay activists took to the streets of San Francisco to protest war in Central America (figure 1). United States president Ronald Reagan, falsely claiming that the forces of Nicaragua’s socialist government had crossed into Honduras, had sent 3,200 US soldiers to the region to prepare for a military assault. ...

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1. Beyond the Gay Ghetto: Founding Debates in Gay Liberation

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pp. 17-41

In October 1969, a group called Gay Liberation Theater staged a street performance entitled “No Vietnamese Ever Called Me a Queer.” These activists brought their claims to two distinct audiences: fellow students at the University of California, Berkeley’s Sproul Plaza and fellow gay men at a meeting of the San Francisco–based Society for Individual Rights (SIR). ...

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2. A More Powerful Weapon: Lesbian Feminism and Collective Defense

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pp. 42-68

On March 27, 1975, police arrested Susan Saxe, a white lesbian and radical, in Philadelphia. Saxe had spent almost five years underground, pursued by the FBI following her participation in two actions in 1970: the theft of National Guard documents that revealed government plans for suppressing dissent against the Vietnam War, and a bank robbery ...

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3. Limp Wrists and Clenched Fists: Defining a Politics and Hitting the Streets

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pp. 69-96

By the mid-1970s, while the broadest wave of gay liberation had receded, in its wake radicals were building a gay and lesbian left. Radical gay men in this period pursued grassroots power and moved toward collaborations with lesbian feminists. Three phases of activism propelled these shifts. First, a small but active network of radical gay men ...

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4. 24th and Mission: Building Lesbian and Gay Solidarity with Nicaragua

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pp. 97-119

The intersection of 24th and Mission Streets in San Francisco is a major gathering point that, since the early 1970s, has stood as a crossroads of many overlapping communities: Chicana/o, Central American, working class, radical, and queer. In 1978, the Third World Gay Caucus conducted outreach at the plaza above the 24th and Mission BART ...

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5. Talk About Loving in the War Years: Nicaragua, Transnational Feminism, and AIDS

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pp. 120-154

In September 1984, a delegation of eighteen women called Somos Hermanas (“we are sisters”) traveled from San Francisco to Nicaragua to learn about women’s experiences in the Sandinista Revolution and to link feminist organizing in the two countries. Somos Hermanas was a project of the Alliance Against Women’s Oppression, ...

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6. Money for AIDS, Not War: Anti-militarism, Direct Action against the Epidemic, and Movement History

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pp. 155-186

In September 1984, several gay men poured fake blood at the entrance of a nuclear weapons laboratory to protest the funding of the arms race rather than research on AIDS. Blocking the road to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, roughly thirty-five miles from Oakland, they added a new layer of meaning to the symbolism of death that marked ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 187-200

In 1991, Henry (Camo) Bortman posed for a poster declaring “Not Every Boy Wants to Be a Soldier” (figure 20). Dressed in a long pink gown that set off his wavy brown hair and graying beard, Bortman gazed at the blossoms of a cherry tree and rested a protest sign on the ground, apparently pausing for reflection at the end of a march. ...

Notes

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pp. 201-266

Bibliography

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pp. 267-286

Index

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pp. 287-309

Further Series Titles

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