Cover

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Half Title

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I am grateful to the many people who made this project possible.
Thank you to the group of strong women who have served as my mentors: Giselle Liza Anatol, Kathryn Conrad, Doreen Fowler, Maryemma Graham, Susan K. Harris, and Jane Hill. Your scholarship and fellowship inspire me. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

In her mixed media collage Do Androids Dream of How People Are Sheep? (2010), Krista Franklin superimposes images of animals, plants, and machines onto a photograph of a black woman in profile. A tiger’s torso defines the woman’s forearm, while an iris encircles her upper arm. A motor fills part of her semi‑transparent breast. ...

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Chapter 1. Temporal Liminality in Toni Morrison's Beloved> and A Mercy

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pp. 11-37

Reading for posthuman liminality in black women’s literature means that we must start simultaneously at the beginning and the end. Contemporary and even futuristic theories enhance our understanding of canonical texts, allowing us to revisit histories and ideas and interpret familiar stories in new ways. ...

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Chapter 2. Posthuman Solidarity in Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose

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pp. 38-57

In July of 2013, following the announcement of George Zimmerman’s acquittal for the 2012 killing of seventeen‑year‑old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, the Twitter hashtag and movement #blacklivesmatter was born (“All”). From July 2013 to July 2014 tweets marked with the hashtag point out historical and contemporary instances of violence against unarmed black men and women, ...

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Chapter 3. Afrofuturist Aesthetics in the Works of Erykah Badu, Janelle Monáe, and Gayl Jones

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pp. 58-78

In Sam Spratt’s cover art for the standard and deluxe editions of Janelle Monáe’s second studio album, The Electric Lady (2013), Monáe promotes the time‑traveling power of Afrofuturism. Literally, she wears her ability to move among past, present, and future temporalities on her sleeve, or rather, her wrist, where she brandishes a barcode. ...

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Chapter 4. Posthuman Multiple Consciousness in Octavia E. Butler’s Science Fiction

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pp. 79-97

In 2016, ten years after her death, Octavia E. Butler experienced a rebirth. Arguably, Butler, the best‑known black woman science fiction writer, never disappeared: the Carl Brandon Society established in 2006 the Octavia E. Butler Memorial Scholarship to support writers of color at the Clarion and Clarion West workshops; ...

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Chapter 5. Submarine Transversality in Texts by Sheree Renée Thomas and Julie Dash

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pp. 98-118

At the opening of Sheree Renée Thomas’s speculative short story “How Sukie Cross de Big Wata” (2003), the Earth’s waters tell about an encounter with a child named Stella, later called Sukie Diamond, on the banks of the Mississippi River.1 The narrator communicates with Stella through “muddy waters” that ask her if she knows the river (327). ...

Notes

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pp. 119-122

Works Cited

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pp. 123-132

Index

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pp. 133-138