Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Figures and Tables

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiv

The inception of the book began in 2010 as a valedictory testimony of three historians who had served as directors of the then Division of Archives and History in the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources for nearly four decades: Larry E. Tise (1975–81), William S. Price Jr. (1981–95), and Jeffrey J. Crow (1995–2012). ...

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Introduction

Larry E. Tise, Jeffrey J. Crow

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pp. 1-13

In 1709 John Lawson—naturalist, surveyor general, and explorer—published A New Voyage to Carolina (London). Lawson’s book provided a meticulous account of his 550-mile, 57-day journey through the backcountry of what would eventually become the states of both South Carolina and North Carolina. Beginning in the port city of Charles Town in December 1700, ...

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An Uncompromising Environment: North Carolina’s “Land of Water” Coastal System

Stanley R. Riggs, Dorothea V. Ames

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pp. 14-40

Geology is the study of our planet’s history, the dynamic processes and sequential development of our planet from its ancient beginnings through the present and into the future. The earth environment inherited by the human species when it developed was dictated by a long history of these earth processes. ...

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Voyages to Carolina: Europeans in the Indians’ Old World

Michael Leroy Oberg, David Moore

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pp. 41-59

For many years, historians telling the story of early North Carolina have focused on the efforts of English explorers backed by Sir Walter Ralegh1 to establish a foothold on the Outer Banks. The state’s history, all too often, thus seems to begin when these ill-fated colonists arrive. But there are alternatives to this Anglocentric narrative. ...

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Intercolonial Conflict and Cooperation during the Tuscarora War

Stephen Feeley

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pp. 60-84

Colonial studies have increasingly focused on the distinctiveness of experiences in different regions, and yet scholarship on North Carolina remains overshadowed by colonial neighbors near and far. Often ignored in its own right, North Carolina does not fit easily into other regional narratives either. ...

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The Conundrum of Unfree Labor

Bradford J. Wood, Larry E. Tise

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pp. 85-109

After his arrival in North Carolina in 1765, newly appointed lieutenant governor William Tryon wrote a detailed letter about his new American home, including some reflections on the institution of slavery in the colony.1 He noted that the colony had more free settlers than slaves but asserted that the “Negroes are very numerious[,] ...

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Land Tenure as Regulator Grievance and Revolutionary Tool

Carole Watterson Troxler

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pp. 110-143

Early on the last Monday of September 1770, dusty paths and byways in the town of Hillsborough already were crowded with more people than usually attended the district court. Their shouting prompted vendors to cry louder as they opened stalls and uncovered carts and wagons. ...

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Evangelical Geographies of North Carolina

Charles F. Irons

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pp. 144-165

George Fox, when he glided up the Pamlico Sound into the Perquimans River in late 1672, saw the same sights and sounds as did other immigrants and visitors to North Carolina. He may have noticed a subtle difference in smell when the brackish water gave way to freshwater, and he certainly gazed upon the many-knobbed cypresses ...

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Money in the Bank: African American Women, Finance, and Freedom in New Bern, North Carolina, 1868–1874

Karin Zipf

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pp. 166-193

“Should [I] die with money in the bank it is to go to Gatsey Cole.” These were the instructions of Gatsey Williams when she opened a bank account at the New Bern branch of the Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company on June 5, 1874. She did not intend to pass her savings to her husband, Sharper J. Williams. ...

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Educational Capital and Human Flourishing: North Carolina’s Public Schools and Universities, 1865–2015

Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore

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pp. 194-216

Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx had three minutes and thirty-six seconds to welcome the Democratic National Convention to his city in 2012. Foxx called Charlotte a place of “energy and commerce,” a place where “business and government work together and make things happen.” ...

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Linthead Stomp: Carolina Cotton Mill Hands and the Modern Origins of Hillbilly Music

Patrick Huber

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pp. 217-240

“Mountaineer musicians of western North Carolina who know little of cities except by legend and who play by native instinct will come to Charlotte today to perpetuate their art for an invisible audience of hundreds of thousands of people,” proclaimed a front-page article in the Charlotte Observer on August 9, 1927. ...

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Tar Heel Politics in the Twentieth Century: The Rise and Fall of the Progressive Plutocracy

Karl E. Campbell

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pp. 241-268

North Carolina politics has long perplexed academics and journalists alike. In the twentieth century North Carolina earned a reputation as the most progressive state in the South. Its commitment to public education, good government, and social moderation stood out in a region better known for rock-ribbed conservatism. ...

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Defying Brown, Defying Pearsall: African Americans and the Struggle for Public School Integration in North Carolina, 1954–1971

Jerry Gershenhorn

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pp. 269-289

On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously in Brown v. Board of Education “that in the field of public education the doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”1 Although this ruling marked the successful culmination of a two-decade-long struggle to overturn ...

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It’s Easier to Pick a Yankee Dollar than a Pound of Cotton: Tourism and North Carolina History

Richard D. Starnes

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pp. 290-315

In the fall of 1964, Governor Terry Sanford convened a group of business leaders to discuss the future of tourism in North Carolina. In a three-day journey across the state with stops in Greenville, Winston-Salem, and Asheville, attendees heard about tourism’s economic impact and potential strategies to increase the flow of visitors. ...

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Chasing Smokestacks: Lessons and Legacies

James C. Cobb

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pp. 316-331

North Carolina’s reputation as the most progressive state in the South may well make it seem somewhat atypical in certain respects, but the story of its post–World War II industrial development efforts and their results is in many important aspects both quintessentially southern and globally relevant as well. Like its southern neighbors, ...

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Failing to Excite: The Dixie Dynamo in the Global Economy

Peter A. Coclanis

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pp. 332-353

The motivation for this essay—and the reason for placing it at the end of this collection—is presumably related to the fact that we are currently living in an uncertain period wherein North Carolina’s principal economic problems, challenges, and opportunities have global dimensions or, at the very least, global connections. ...

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A New Description of North Carolina

Larry E. Tise, Jeffrey J. Crow

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pp. 354-390

The essays in this volume were inspired in part, as we said at the outset, by John Lawson’s classic book A New Voyage to Carolina (1709). Looking back over the preceding pages, we are reminded of Lawson’s long journey and the skillful narratives of early North Carolina that resulted from his voyage. ...

Index

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pp. 391-410