Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-x

Betty Gail Brown was nineteen years old in 1961, a sophomore at Transylvania College in Lexington, Kentucky, still living at home with her parents. A very serious student, she participated in a wide range of extracurricular activities and had lots of friends on...

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1. The Murder of Betty Gail Brown

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pp. 1-16

On October 26, 1961, Betty Gail Brown was in her second year of study at Transylvania College, the oldest institution of higher education in Kentucky and one of the oldest in the country, founded in 1780 when Kentucky was still a part of the state of Virginia...

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2. The Initial Investigation

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pp. 17-46

Captain Cravens and Captain Henry were in no doubt that Betty Gail Brown had been murdered from their first sight of the crime scene. They saw the body of a young woman sitting in the driver’s seat of the car with her feet on the floorboard and her head tilted...

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3. Cooling Down of a Hot Case

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pp. 47-70

The Betty Gail Brown murder was easily one of the hottest criminal cases ever to occur in the city of Lexington, partly because of the nature of the victim (an attractive young coed), partly because of the nature of the killing (the strangulation of a young...

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4. Arrival of a Real Suspect

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pp. 71-88

Klamath Falls was a quiet, midsize town of thirty thousand people that was located on Oregon’s side of its border with the state of California. One of its occupants on January 16, 1965, was Alex Arnold Jr., a thirty-three-year-old man who had been born...

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5. Events Preceding Trial

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pp. 89-134

On the basis of a sworn affidavit from Captain Cravens showing reasonable grounds for believing that Alex Arnold had murdered Betty Gail Brown, Judge Richard P. Moloney of Lexington’s Police Court issued a warrant for Arnold’s arrest that included an...

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6. The Trial

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pp. 135-182

When Judge Joseph Bradley opened court on Monday morning, October 4, 1965, for the murder trial of Alex Arnold, he found a most unusual situation: a courtroom without a single empty seat and with an overflow crowd standing against the walls.1 Don...

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Conclusion

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pp. 183-188

After getting the jury’s decision, out of relief and not at all for purposes of celebration, Judge Eblen and I spent the evening together having a private dinner and talking about both the past and the future:
Eblen: Very close to a dead heat, I would say. I wonder how many...

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Epilogue

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pp. 189-194

Did Alex Arnold kill Betty Gail Brown? I have been asked that question hundreds of times and have never found it easy to answer. My difficulty with the question began almost as soon as I saw Arnold for the first time, in a jail cell in Lexington two or...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 195-196

In my efforts to reconstruct the historical events described in my book, I received lots of assistance from a multitude of sources. I obtained indispensable assistance from the Lexington Police Department, which provided me with copies of all the records...

Notes

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pp. 197-202

Index

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pp. 203-206