Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

I am writing this chapter on a gray, wet winter day, in the café in the sports complex at Trent University as my two kids attend swimming lessons.1 The doors of the complex have Trent’s logo on them—the French “explorer” Champlain’s sword, jutting into waves, or as my elder Doug Williams often cynically jokes, ...

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1. Nishnaabeg Brilliance as Radical Resurgence Theory

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pp. 11-26

Gilbert drove the kids from the reserve into town for school every morning, and sometimes when we would come to visit, he would drive another lap around the reserve to pick up all the Elders in his yellow and black bus, driving us to the treatment center or out to the community trapline on the edge of the reserve. I was in my midtwenties. ...

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2. Kwe as Resurgent Method

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pp. 27-38

While the few years I spent with the elders of Long Lake #58 are responsible for me falling deeply in love with Nishnaabewin, they are also the beginning of me being able to link the experiences of my life with a critique and analysis of colonialism. As an instructor in many different Indigenous land-based programs, ...

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3. The Attempted Dispossession of Kwe

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pp. 39-54

A few years ago, the Ontario government recognized the hunting and fishing rights promised to the Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg in the 1818 treaty, after refusing to do so for eighty-nine years.1 This made me happy. I am now able to hunt and fish in my territory without worrying that constant settler surveillance ...

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4. Nishnaabeg Internationalism

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pp. 55-70

When I was in my third year of biology at the University at Guelph in the early 1990s, I traveled to McMaster University with an antiracism student group for a conference on racism. It was a different time for Indigenous students at Canadian universities. It was rare even to see another Indigenous person on campus at that time. ...

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5. Nishnaabeg Anticapitalism

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pp. 71-82

In early 2013, author, social activist, and filmmaker Naomi Klein, known for her political criticism of corporate globalization and capitalism through her activism and her international best sellers No Logo and The Shock Doctrine, e-mailed me and asked if she could interview me for what would become a New York Times best seller, ...

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6. Endlessly Creating Our Indigenous Selves

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pp. 83-94

For the past few years, when I talk about gender in Indigenous postsecondary classrooms, primarily classes on self-determination, resurgence, and governance, I lead the students through a simple exercise to begin. As a group, I ask them to list all the stereotypes they have been the target of or have heard about Indigenous women. ...

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7. The Sovereignty of Indigenous Peoples’ Bodies

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pp. 95-118

My maternal family can trace our ancestry to the original families in the Grape Island Mission and the Bay of Quinte Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg. The attempts to assimilate us were the responsibility of Indian agents, the Methodist missionaries, and the education system because settlers wanted our lands. ...

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8. Indigenous Queer Normativity

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pp. 119-144

My family regularly participates in sweat lodge ceremonies. My kids have grown up in this ceremony. This past summer, we came together in community as we always had. At the time, my daughter was questioning her gender and how to express it in a truthful way. She was not wearing skirts, or lace, ...

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9. Land as Pedagogy

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pp. 145-174

Over the past few years, I’ve spent a lot of time each March in the sugar bush. The practice of harvesting sap and making maple syrup has been a foundational experience for me and my family. The following Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg story was told to me by Doug Williams. This is my own retelling of it, ...

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10. “I See Your Light”: Reciprocal Recognition and Generative Refusal

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pp. 175-190

Indigenous scholarship has recently experienced crucial interventions into how we account, frame, and tell the truths of the political and cultural lives of Indigenous peoples that move away from a constriction of our intelligence within the confines of Western thought and the dumbing down ...

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11. Embodied Resurgent Practice and Coded Disruption

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pp. 191-210

In “Everyday Decolonization: Living a Decolonizing Queer Politics,” Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) scholar and resurgence theorist Sarah Hunt and non-Indigenous scholar Cindy Holmes ask, “What does decolonization look and feel like, what does it entail, in our daily actions as queer women? ...

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12. Constellations of Coresistance

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pp. 211-232

Stars, in Edna Manitowabi’s telling of the Seven Fires creation story, represent the thoughts of Gzhwe Manidoo.1 In the first attempt at creating this world, Gzhwe Manidoo’s thoughts and ideas went out into the universe in perpetuity because there was no physical structure to embody them. ...

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Conclusion Toward Radical Resurgent Struggle

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pp. 233-248

I am writing this final section in Tio’tia:ke/Montreal in April. This place holds meaning for me as a Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg because my people came here often to trade, to visit, and to maintain diplomatic ties with the Kanien’kehá:ka. It is also in some ways the birthplace of my own politicization, witnessing the mobilization and resistance at Kanehsatà:ke during the summer of 1990. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 249-250

Nothing is ever created in isolation, and this book is no exception. It was made in a community of relationships within which I exist, and although I am responsible for the mistakes and missteps, I am not responsible for the insights and the brilliance: these come from the land, ...

Notes

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pp. 251-282

Index

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pp. 283-313

About the Author

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