Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

This book would have been an impossible project without the very generous support of several institutions and individuals. My editors at Syracuse University Press, Alison Shay and Kelly Balenske, helped push the manuscript forward, answered all of my (many) questions, and made the revisions...

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1. Orientation

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pp. 1-13

Few German geographers lived through as much territorial upheaval and uncertainty as Emil Meynen, and none was so successful at transforming himself. By the time Meynen died, on August 23, 1994, at the age of ninety-one, he had worked for the Nazis, their Allied conquerors, the...

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2. Germany’s Cartographic Collapse

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pp. 14-58

The spatial condition of Germany after the Second World War can only be understood as one key moment in a long and continual process. The development of German identity and nationalism, particularly regarding the inclusion or exclusion of territory deemed “German,” has a turbulent...

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3. Rebuilding Germany’s Geography: An Occupation

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pp. 59-99

On the fifth of December 1948, a young German named Theodor typed a letter to his teacher, Mr. Schmidt. In broken English, Theodor thanked his teacher for a recently received care package and praised the American military’s “gentleness” as a postwar occupying force.1 In the town of...

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4. The End of Occupation?

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pp. 100-120

The encouraging and hopeful words spoken in the opening of the Sixteenth International Geographical Union Congress personified the excitement of the group of men gathered from twenty-nine countries, all seated in Lisbon’s Portuguese National Assembly hall, on April 8, 1949...

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5. Mapping and Selling the Two-State Solution

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pp. 121-148

Both the American and Soviet geographers understood the importance of German space. As the historian Carolyn Eisenberg convincingly argues, “The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union was most geographically expressed in the division of [Germany].”1 This expression...

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6. Conclusion: Mapping Germany, Mapping Europe

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pp. 149-156

The fluidity of German territory dictated the foreign policies of non- European powers toward Europe throughout the twentieth century. The construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 established a concrete “iron curtain” between a capitalist West and a Communist East as well as a symbol...

Notes

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pp. 157-184

Bibliography

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pp. 185-198

Index

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pp. 199-208

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About the Author

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pp. 209-210

Matthew D. Mingus is assistant professor of history at the University of New Mexico at Gallup. He loves living in New Mexico and spending time with his wife, Lindsey, their son, Isaac, and their dogs, Dixie and Oakley. When Professor Mingus is not...