Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

A Note on Transliteration

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

The book you hold in your hands is the result of fifteen years of training and research in ethnomusicology and Indian music, an undertaking inconceivable in the absence of countless teachers, guides, colleagues, interlocutors, and loved ones. Their generosity of spirit undergirds every page of this book. With inevitable...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

I arrived in Lucknow in 2007 in search of a culture long declared dead and gone. Like generations of scholars and laypeople before me, I lost myself within the tales of royal decadence leaping from the pages of Abdul Halim Sharar’s classic history, Lucknow: The Last Phase of an Oriental Culture (2001 [1975]). Populated...

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1. “Oh Father, My Home Is Being Left Behind”

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pp. 19-43

From 1916 to 1925, the celebrated music scholar Vishnu Narayan Bhatkhande (1860–1936) convened a series of All- India Music Conferences bringing together for the first time the most prestigious musicians of the day with the community of music scholars and the general public. Among the most significant...

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2. The Challenge of Ṭhumrī

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pp. 44-67

In March of 2009, I made a trip to Delhi to meet Gulfam Ahmad Khan, sarod player of the Lucknow gharānā. Leaving the heart of New Delhi, I crossed the Yamuna River, eventually finding Gulfam’s neighborhood, where I was aided by a succession of generous neighbors who guided me through the narrow walkways...

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3. Rival Tales and Tales of Rivalry

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pp. 68-99

Some three hundred pages into Vikram Seth’s epic novel A Suitable Boy, a tense scene unfolds within the canteen at an All India Radio facility. The antagonists are Ishaq Khan, a lowly sāraṅgī player, and Majeed Khan, a high-status vocalist who “sat alone at the head of the table by the far wall, musing and stirring his...

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4. The College and the Ustād

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pp. 100-128

In November of 1952, Lucknow’s Marris College of Hindustani Music celebrated its Silver Jubilee, marking twenty-five years as India’s preeminent institution of music education. The president of India, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, attended the opening ceremonies and enjoyed a concert arranged in his honor at the...

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5. Voices and Visions from the Archive

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pp. 129-158

For six days in March of 1916, musicians, politicians, scholars, princes, and the general public gathered in Baroda for the first All-India Music Conference. The mastermind of the conference, V. N. Bhatkhande, offered a speech on the opening day that framed the collective endeavor: it was time to both revive...

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Epilogue

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pp. 159-164

In 2010 Irfan Khan left his position as head of the department of music at the Delhi Public School, where I first met him in Numaligarh, Assam. He was convinced to do so by a generous offer from the founder of a new school of music in Kabul, Afghanistan: the Afghanistan National Institute of Music. Irfan had...

Notes

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pp. 165-174

Bibliography

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pp. 175-190

Index

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pp. 191-205

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About the Author

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p. 206

Max Katz is associate professor of music at the College of William and Mary.