In this Book

summary
Dostoevsky was hostile to the notion of individual autonomy, and yet, throughout his life and work, he vigorously advocated the freedom and inviolability of the self. This ambivalence has animated his diverse and often self-contradictory legacy: as precursor of psychoanalysis, forefather of existentialism, postmodernist avant la lettre, religious traditionalist, and Romantic mystic. 

Dostoevsky and the Riddle of the Self charts a unifying path through Dostoevsky's artistic journey to solve the “mystery” of the human being. Starting from the unusual forms of intimacy shown by characters seeking to lose themselves within larger collective selves, Yuri Corrigan approaches the fictional works as a continuous experimental canvas on which Dostoevsky explored the problem of selfhood through recurring symbolic and narrative paradigms. Presenting new readings of such works as The IdiotDemons, and The Brothers Karamazov, Corrigan tells the story of Dostoevsky’s career-long journey to overcome the pathology of collectivism by discovering a passage into the wounded, embattled, forbidding, revelatory landscape of the psyche. 

Corrigan’s argument offers a fundamental shift in theories about Dostoevsky's work and will be of great interest to scholars of Russian literature, as well as to readers interested in the prehistory of psychoanalysis and trauma studies and in theories of selfhood and their cultural sources.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-15
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  1. Chapter One. On the Dangers of Intimacy (The Vasia Shumkov Paradigm)
  2. pp. 16-29
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  1. Chapter Two. Amnesia and the Collective Personality in the Early Works
  2. pp. 30-50
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  1. Chapter Three. Transparency and Trauma in The Insulted and Injured
  2. pp. 51-67
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  1. Chapter Four. Beyond the Dispersed Self in The Idiot
  2. pp. 68-85
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  1. Chapter Five. On the Education of Demons and Unfinished Selves
  2. pp. 86-103
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  1. Chapter Six. The Hiding Places of the Self in The Adolescent
  2. pp. 104-119
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  1. Chapter Seven. The Apprenticeship of the Self in The Brothers Karamazov
  2. pp. 120-141
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 142-150
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 151-214
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 215-230
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 231-238
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780810135710
Related ISBN
9780810135703
MARC Record
OCLC
1003931514
Pages
246
Launched on MUSE
2017-09-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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