Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Series Foreword

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pp. vii-viii

Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice: From Loncheras to Lobsta Love is the thirteenth book in the Food, Health, and the Environment series. The series explores the global and local dimensions of food systems and issues of access; social, environmental, and food justice; and community well-being...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Julian would like to thank all the chapter authors for their enthusiasm, insights, and dedication to making this book happen. Your perspectives helped us both to better frame our arguments and to organize the book. I would like to thank all at MIT Press with whom this is my sixth publication...

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1. Introduction

Julian Agyeman, Caitlin Matthews, and Hannah Sobel

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pp. 1-20

The urban foodscape is changing rapidly. There are fish tacos, vegan cupcakes, gourmet pizzas, and barbeque ribs, all served from the confines of cramped, idling, and often garishly painted trucks. These food trucks,1 part of a wider phenomenon of street food vending or street foods (Tinker...

I. Democratic vs. Regulatory Practices

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2. Relaxing Regulatory Controls: Vendor Advocacy and Rights in Mobile Food Vending

Ginette Wessel

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pp. 23-46

In 2008, with little warning, urban policymakers across the United States found themselves increasingly involved in regulatory debates and policy revisions surrounding mobile food vending. Gourmet-style food vendors began invigorating unfamiliar urban spaces and providing new food...

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3. Decriminalize Street Vending: Reform and Social Justice

Kathleen Dunn

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pp. 47-66

Enthusiatic media coverage of food trucks in the United States—their quirky “foodie” offerings, their festivals and competitions, and even their reality shows on cable television—might lead observers to think a new urban food trend has emerged overnight, revitalizing public space in the process. The...

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4. To Serve and to Protect: Food Trucks and Food Safety in a Transforming Los Angeles

Mark Vallianatos

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pp. 67-86

Food trucks are magical urbanism on four wheels. They unmoor food from the “brick and mortar” of traditional retail, bringing meals and commerce to parts of the city where it is barred by zoning or absent due to economics. Industrial catering trucks provide a break from tightly controlled assembly...

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5. Stuck in Park: New York City’s War on Food Trucks

Sean Basinski, Matthew Shapiro, and Alfonso Morales

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pp. 87-108

Patricia Monroy and Alberto Loera, a mother and son taco truck vending team who operated in New York City, were introduced in chapter 3. In this chapter, we further detail the injustices they experienced at the hands of local government and the legal system.
Patricia had always been entrepreneurial...

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6. Learning from New Orleans: Will Revising or Relaxing Public Space Ordinances Create a Just Environment for Street Commerce?

Renia Ehrenfeucht and Ana Croegaert

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pp. 109-128

Residents and visitors alike celebrate New Orleans’s public culture. Locals by the thousands come out for Mardi Gras Indians Super Sunday and dozens of neighborhood and citywide events, and the Jazz and Heritage Festival and Mardi Gras also attract national and international visitors. People...

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7. From Hippie to Hip: City Governance and Two Eras of Street Vending in Vancouver, Canada

Amy Hanser

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pp. 129-148

In the late summer of 1974, two Vancouver aldermen made an inspection tour of street vending on Granville Street, one of the city’s major downtown shopping streets. They were not happy with what they found. “That’s ridiculous,” Jack Volrich, one of the aldermen, was quoted as saying of...

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8. Reflexive Food Truck Justice: A Case Study in CLiCK, Inc., a Nonprofit, Shared-Use Commercial Kitchen

Phoebe Godfrey

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pp. 149-166

In the popular film Chef (2014), gourmet chef Carl Casper quits his restaurant job and ends up freewheeling around the country in a food truck. With some help from his son’s social media skills, as well as his and his sous-chef’s culinary skills, collectively they produce a Cuban sandwich worth waiting...

II. Spatial-Cultural Practices

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9. The Spatial Practices of Food Trucks

Robert Lemon

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pp. 169-188

The title of this text—Food Trucks, Cultural Identity, and Social Justice: From Loncheras to Lobsta Love—underscores the increasingly diverse variety of food trucks in America. A lonchera operator prepares typically traditional tacos for a primarily immigrant, Mexican, working-class clientele. Meanwhile...

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10. Eating in the City: Fidel Gastro, Street Performance, and the Right to the City

Edward Whittall

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pp. 189-206

Matt Basile is a showman. Going by the stage name “Fidel Gastro,” he branded himself as the “rebel without a kitchen” because he neither trained as a cook nor owned a restaurant or a food truck. He was a vagabond performer, and his specialty was the pop-up, one-off events usually staged in...

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11. Why Local Regulations May Matter Less Than We Think: Street Vending in Chicago and in Durham, North Carolina

Nina Martin

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pp. 207-224

Gourmet food trucks roaming the streets of US cities have become a common sight over the last ten years and are an essential part of the food scene in places as diverse as New York City, Seattle, Chicago, and Durham, North Carolina. Some city governments have responded by writing and...

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12. Breach, Bridgehead, or Trojan Horse? An Exploration of the Role of Food Trucks in Montreal’s Changing Foodscape

Alan Nash

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pp. 225-242

After a ban on food trucks that lasted almost seventy years, in 2013 the Canadian city of Montreal inaugurated a two-year pilot program that permitted approximately thirty trucks back onto its streets (the exact number being determined by how many trucks successfully gained the approval of...

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13. Scripting the City: Street Food, Urban Policy, and Neoliberal Redevelopment in Vancouver, Canada

Lenore Lauri Newman and Katherine Alexandra Newman

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pp. 243-262

Vancouver has a carefully cultivated reputation as a livable city, in part due to its natural setting and urban green spaces, but also as the result of efforts to establish safe, walkable residential neighborhoods right in the downtown core. The suburban ideals that the city embodies are leveraged...

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14. Atlanta’s Food Truck Fervor: Policy Impediments and Entrepreneurial Efforts to Expand Mobile Cuisine

Mackenzie Wood, Jennifer Clark, and Emma French

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pp. 263-284

Atlanta’s food truck scene is thriving. The number of trucks operating in metro Atlanta grew seventeenfold over the last five years, from six trucks in 2010 to over one hundred in 2015 (Smith and Rentz Smith 2014).1 Now, every day of the week, residents and visitors can purchase an array...

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15. Is It Local ... or Authentic and Exotic? Ethnic Food Carts and Gastropolitan Habitus on Portland’s Eastside

Nathan McClintock, Alex Novie, and Matthew Gebhardt

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pp. 285-310

Celebrated as a “mighty gastropolis” (Brooks 2012), Portland, Oregon, is home to a vibrant local food movement that links the bounty of nearby farms to the wealth of farmers’ markets, farm stands, community-supported agriculture drop-offs, grocers, farm-to-table restaurants, and food carts integral...

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Reflections

Julian Agyeman, Caitlin Matthews, and Hannah Sobel

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pp. 311-316

We entered into the idea for this book by wondering primarily about municipal street food vending and food truck regulations and their implications for cultural identity formation and ultimately the broader goal of increasing social justice. Specifically, we asked our contributing authors the...

List of Contributors

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pp. 317-318

Index

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pp. 319-336