Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-x

Contents

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xxiv

Between 1715 and 1717 a posthumous work dealing with minerals and fossils written by a former papal physician, Michele Mercati, was published with funding from Pope Clement XI. The book was entitled Metallotheca and detailed the natural history collections of several late sixteenth-century...

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1. The Beginnings of Government Support for Paleontology

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pp. 1-27

Seventy years ago a young archaeologist named William G. Haag was working on a PhD in cultural anthropology and archaeology from the University of Kentucky. He had no prospects for a job upon completion of his degree, but like many during the tail end of the Great Depression, he...

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2. Eighteenth-Century and Early Nineteenth-Century Paleontologists and Patrons

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pp. 28-49

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, there were frequent cases of an interest in science or other forms of learned activities being a means of entertainment for the wealthy and powerful. This sort of social-intellectual club was not new; they had been around for centuries. However, and frequently...

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3. Developments in Government Support for Paleontology in the United States between 1830 and about 1880

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pp. 50-109

Following the model of a federal military geological survey established by Thomas Jefferson for the Lewis and Clark Expedition, a number of states began their own geological surveys in the 1820s and 1830s. The enthusiasm for the establishment of state geological surveys is a testament to the entrepreneurial...

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4. Paleontology in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Surveys Outside the United States

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pp. 110-124

Writing about the Geological Society of London in a history of the Geological Survey of Great Britain at its centenary in 1935, the survey director, John Smith Flett, commented about the composition of the Geological Society at its beginnings. This institution he clearly saw as instrumental in...

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5. Government Support for Paleontology in the Late Nineteenth Century and the Turn of the Twentieth Century: 1880 to about 1940

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pp. 125-157

The last twenty years of the nineteenth century and the first decades of the twentieth century saw continued governmental interest and support of various kinds for paleontology. The Geological Surveys, especially in the United States and Canada, became somewhat more competitive with both...

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Conclusion: The Chain of Paleontology

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pp. 158-172

In 1880, Canadian paleontologist John W. Dawson wrote a popular book on paleontology called The Chain of Life in Geologic Time. I think that this title is an apt metaphor for what we have covered in the current work concerning the history of how paleontology, geology, and government support...

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Appendix: Glossary of Prominent Patrons and Paleontologists

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pp. 173-198

Agassiz was a Swiss naturalist and paleontologist. He studied biology and medicine simultaneously and obtained advanced degrees in both fields. He was considered to be the most prominent ichthyologist of his day. In conjunction with this, he was also the prominent expert on fossil fish. Agassiz...

Annotated Bibliography of Primary Sources

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pp. 199-218

Bibliography of Secondary Sources

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pp. 219-228

Index

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pp. 229-234