Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xvi

A book project is never the work of a singular individual alone. I have been blessed to know and benefit from the knowledge, expertise, and company of many amazing people.
First and foremost are my partner, Kyngelle, and our son, Caiden: thank you for your love and patience and for immensely...

read more

Prologue. Inscribing Liberation: Contexts and Conditions of Black Radicalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-12

Radical Intellect is a political and cultural history of one of the lesser acknowledged, but widely influential, periodicals of the 1960s and early 1970s, Liberator magazine. More than the story of a periodical, however, this history is concerned with the political and cultural work of a loosely assembled...

read more

1. Voices of Black Protest: Contours of Anticolonialism and Black Liberation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-37

Anticolonialism, decolonialization, independence, anti-imperialism, self-governance, and self-determination were watchwords of a black new world order in the 1960s. John Henrik Clarke’s observance bespoke considerable energies devoted to the cause of African liberation given by black bodies...

read more

2. Spokespersons and Advocates: The Contested Intellectual Life of African Independence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 38-73

African American grassroots groups prepared to support African liberation had their work cut out for them. On one hand they were poised to influence U.S. policy in Africa; on the other hand the work of liberation was right outside their New York City door. Desiring to influence the course of African...

read more

3. Radical Commitments: The Promise of Black Women’s Activism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 74-119

Women in the black liberation era performed an array of roles, held numerous positions, and were often as revolutionary and radical in their approaches and perspectives on racial justice as their male counterparts in this movement. Though often ignored in the histories of these movements, the...

read more

4. Rebellion or Revolution: The Challenge of Black Radicalism

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-184

Maintaining a handle on the tempo of African American, Afro-diasporic, and Africa liberatory energies was no small task. While numerous world events, notably the Vietnam War, loomed large over this period of political activities, African independence remained at the center of Liberator’s perspective...

read more

5. New Breeds, Old Dreams: Liberator and Black Radical Aesthetics

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-234

Larry Neal’s description of the emergence of a new wave of black artists would be a clarion call only second to that of Amiri Baraka’s Black Arts Repertory and Theater School (BARTS) manifesto. Similar to Michelle Wilkinson’s use of “socio-aesthetics,”1 black radical aesthetics include the cultural...

read more

Epilogue. Refusing to Go Quietly

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-242

By 1970 Liberator had begun to show the signs of a declining publication. After ten years of publishing, the former pulse of the radical scene had all the markings of transition into an uncertain future. Internecine differences among the staff left only a small number of committed individuals...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 243-280

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 281-298

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 299-330