Cover

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Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

William E. Reaves

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pp. vii-x

In the production of any book many individuals and institutions make important contributions. It is my privilege to acknowledge and recognize those key players for this publication and convey my genuine regard for their stellar efforts on behalf of the entire project.

I thank my business partner and professional colleague, Sarah Foltz. Sarah has served as co–project director for the Richard Stout Project, and in this capacity she has worked tirelessly to help secure the necessary funds, organize and disseminate images of the artist’s works, and provide the innumerable forms of editorial assistance and support to make the project...

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Introduction

William E. Reaves

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pp. 1-2

As a longtime collector of Texas art and now a dealer in the same field, I have been privileged to know and work with many accomplished Texas artists. I have derived much inspiration from each of these relationships, and my admiration for these artists and their work runs deep. No artist, however, has inspired me more than Richard Stout.

On a personal level, Stout affected me immediately through his paintings, especially his poetic and sensitive expressions of the Texas coast. It is a part of the country in which we both grew up and for which we both share deep and obvious appreciation. It is a part of the country that Richard Stout interprets masterfully in his art, painting the Gulf and its endless bays and estuaries with perhaps greater frequency,...

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Bound to the Sea

Katie Robinson Edwards

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pp. 3-10

The emblem of the cosmopolitan modernist artist, Richard Stout is a native Texan. He has been making art virtually his entire life, producing thousands of paintings, sculptures, and works on paper.1 Over the years Stout had made consistently high-caliber work, remaining true to his themes and interests, expanding and exploring them. Regularly producing superlative work over a long career would be laudable enough, but Stout matches his skill with in-depth investigations of profound material. As the new millennium approached, Stout was in his sixties. Rather than wane, his work “entered an area of excellence that is both startling and engrossing,” wrote the philosopher-scholar Thomas McEvilley.2 Still today Stout continues to surprise and delight with new paintings and drawings that...

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The Silence That Lives in Houses (After Henri Matisse)

David E. Brauer

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pp. 11-16

Stout has been, and remains, primarily a painter, also a printmaker, and in recent years sculpture has become a significant presence in his work. Stout is one of the few artists who can give acrylic the depth of oils. This current overview shows clearly the changes that emerged in Stout’s painting from circa 1985, an expressive deepening probably brought about, as McEvilley notes in Richard Stout: Approaching the Limits of Space (2004),1 by personal tragedy in the artist’s life. What resulted was new emphasis on how interiors and exteriors compenetrate as they evolve from views to states...

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Sculpture

Jim Edwards

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pp. 17-22

In the March 2004 catalogue Richard Stout: Approaching the Limits of Space, the late esteemed writer Thomas McEvilley made a case that Stout’s tabletop sculptures are more nearly postmodern than his better-known paintings, “if only because of the use, in many of them, of found crumpled cardboard scraps as their beginnings—somewhat as Robert Rauschenberg (1925−2008) did in the 1960s.”1 McEvilley is being sensitive to the inherent physical properties of Stout’s newly found material and the possibilities for these scraps being made anew as sculptural supports. There are in fact big differences between Rauschenberg’s large-scale, mostly flat-to-the-wall, cardboard works—especially from his Card Birds series—and Stout’s...

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A Vision of Home

Sarah Beth Wilson

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pp. 23-30

Anyone who has met Richard Stout knows that he embodies a certain presence. Specific words come to mind when I think of how best to describe him—intelligent, elegant, sophisticated, witty, original. Although a simple word, this last characteristic is a distinguishing feature; many artists strive for originality—a fresh and raw vision—but few truly embody the essence of the word. Richard is a highly original artist with an uncompromising vision for his past and present artwork. This constant vision is the foundation that binds the bravura of his early paintings with the brilliant sophistication, both visually and thematically, of his current body of work—exploring new and invigorating horizons in both two and three dimensions. Richard ventures into these open waters with seamless ease, effortlessly transitioning between media...

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The Topography of Intimate Being

Mark White

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pp. 31-40

Children form often profound and indelible attachments to place in ways that shape their perception of other environments for the remainder of their lives. Home is not only where the heart is, but also the mind, in many respects. It might be argued that artists, in particular, are responsive to the specifics of such places, or what writer Don Gayton has called the primal landscape, and, despite whatever influences they pick up during their education, that primal landscape remains a vital part of the ego.1

For Richard Stout, the coastal environment of southeastern Texas and its attendant culture have anchored much of his career. An earnest topophilia permeates Stout’s oeuvre, not only in his attachment to landscape but also in his adoration of domestic spaces. Though many of his paintings depict physical locations, his concern has been neither a representation of appearance nor likeness but the poetic image,...

Gallery

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pp. 41-122

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Artist Biography

Linda J. Reaves

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pp. 123-128

Richard Stout was born in 1934 in Beaumont, Texas. He quickly discovered his interest in art and, while still in high school, studied at the Art Academy of Cincinnati during summer visits with family in Ohio. Stout received a scholarship to attend the School of Art at the Art Institute of Chicago, where he earned his bachelor of fine arts (BFA). He completed graduate studies and earned his master of fine arts (MFA) at the University of Texas at Austin. From 1959 to 1967, Stout was an instructor at the Museum School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. After completing his MFA, he began teaching art at the University of Houston, a career he maintained until his retirement in 1996. Stout was named Texas Artist of the Year in 2004 by the Art League of Houston and, in 2010, received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Center for the Advancement and Study of Early Texas...

About the Contributors

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pp. 129-130

Index

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pp. 131-134

Cover

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