Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

This book has taken eight years to write and is the culmination of twenty years’ research and contemplation, so unsurprisingly there are many people whom I wish to thank along the way. I owe the greatest debt to four borderland families: those of Boumairam Ismailova and the late Hotamjon Hojibuvaev in Osh, and Asylbek Joroev and Solimirza Jumabaev in Chek. ...

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Note on Place Names and Transliteration

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pp. xv-xviii

A major purpose of this book is to critically interrogate the processes of nationalism, which have wreaked such havoc on the geographies of the Ferghana Valley borderlands. Many studies of Central Asian nationalism focus on just one country. Although these texts may raise critical questions about the creation of national identities within national spaces, by confining their research ...

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Introduction. Making Borders, Making Worlds: Whose Border?

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pp. 3-31

On a wintry night, sixty-year-old Gulya was preparing to cross the Uzbekistan-Kyrgyzstan border.1 Although she had made this once simple journey countless times in her life, this would be her final and most dangerous attempt. The decision to undertake it had effectively been made for her by the recent leveling of the home in which she had lived with her husband for some forty years. ...

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Chapter 1. Uzbekistan: Building the Nation, Defending the Border

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pp. 32-76

On December 12, 1991, the last first secretary of the Communist Party of Uzbekistan and first president of the independent Republic of Uzbekistan, Islam Karimov, landed at an airport outside the city of Ashgabat to meet his counterparts from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan. Four days previously the heads of Russia, Belarus, ...

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Chapter 2. Kyrgyzstan: Contested Visions of the Nation

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pp. 77-133

The decision of the government of Uzbekistan to tighten control of its state border from 1999 on had profound implications for the people of southern Kyrgyzstan. A technically extant but in practice almost unnoticed boundary became a concrete reality of quotidian life as the border rematerialized in multiple ways. ...

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Chapter 3. Caught in the Middle: Life in the “Neutral Zone”

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pp. 134-188

On July 7, 2013, eighty-four-year-old Her Royal Highness Princess Shirley of Hutt died. Otherwise known as Mrs. Shirley Casley, she and her husband, Len, were Australian wheat farmers when, in 1970, they discovered that the West Australia Wheat Board monopoly would, under prevailing quota restrictions, only pay for 10 percent of their crop. ...

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Chapter 4. Osh’s Borders: A Matter of Life and Death

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pp. 189-240

In June 2010 the logics of Ferghana Valley nation-state boundary making intersected with the contingencies of a power struggle in semiliberal Kyrgyzstan with deadly consequences. The bloody overthrow of the corrupt and unpopular Bakiev regime that April created a dangerous power vacuum marked by attempted counterrevolutions and the further assertion of organized crime. ...

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Conclusion. The Destruction of the Ferghana Valley

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pp. 241-260

In 1996 presidents Akaev of Kyrgyzstan and Karimov of Uzbekistan signed a Treaty of Eternal Friendship between their two states.1 Each spoke of their determination to limit the materializations of the mutual border between their newly independent countries. When I first began crossing the Uzbekistan-Kyrgyzstan border, before the treaty was signed, ...

Appendix I. Transliteration Tables

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pp. 261-262

Appendix II. Divergent Spellings

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pp. 263-264

Notes

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pp. 265-304

Bibliography

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pp. 305-330

Index

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pp. 331-348

Back Cover

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p. 349