Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures, Tables, and Maps

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pp. ix-xii

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Preface: Dueling Futures

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pp. xiii-xxiv, 1-2

North Carolina was a different place in the 1970s. Its population was smaller, younger, whiter, and less educated than it would be at the dawn of the twenty-first century. Although changes were under way, the “Big Three” industries of tobacco, textiles, and furniture still dominated the state’s economy. ...

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1. Will They Still Come?

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pp. 3-12

For most of its history, North Carolina lagged the nation in population growth (fig. 1.1). Like the rest of the South, North Carolina in the colonial and antebellum periods was an agricultural and rural region with a low population density. This began to change in the late nineteenth century with the mechanization of farming and the resulting shift to machinery inputs and away from human labor in agriculture. ...

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2. Hot Places and Open Spaces

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pp. 13-21

In 1970, over half (54 percent) of North Carolinians lived in rural areas, making the state the sixth most rural in the nation, behind Vermont, West Virginia, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Mississippi. Even agricultural states like Nebraska and Kansas had a higher percentage of people living in cities.1 Charlotte, the state’s largest city, had fewer than 250,000 residents.2 ...

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3. Where’s the Growth?

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pp. 22-42

In the past century, the North Carolina economy has undergone two major transformations. The first was the movement off the farm and into the factory. As the Industrial Revolution came to agriculture, tractors and other equipment replaced the work of thousands of farmers. Fortunately, this was just when manufacturing was developing and expanding in the state, with scores of new textile, ...

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4. Winners and Losers in Making a Living

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pp. 43-60

Economists use the term “human capital” as a shorthand for the skills, training, and formal educational levels of the workforce. As economies have progressed in the twentieth century and into the twenty-first century, the development of human capital has become the focus for the economic improvement of states as well as nations. ...

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5. Resetting Education

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pp. 61-77

If North Carolina is to create new occupations and jobs to replace those expected to be lost to technology, many pieces will have to fall in place. Perhaps the most important is the education and training system. Educational institutions and techniques will have to be revamped to accommodate the increasingly dynamic labor force continually remade during the twenty-first century. ...

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6. Requiem for Resources?

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pp. 78-92

North Carolina is known for its uncommon beauty and natural resources. The state’s coast, forests and national parks, rivers and lakes, mountains, and world-class golf courses nestled in valleys and the flat Piedmont plateau are major attractions and contribute enormously to the quality of life enjoyed by its inhabitants. ...

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7. Government’s Role—Lean In or Back Off ?

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pp. 93-110

Government in North Carolina will have to change to successfully address the challenges beyond the Connected Age. Although it appears contradictory, government will have to do both more in some areas and less in others. The realignment of government functions will be difficult, and considerable political tension will ensue during the process. ...

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8. Is the Future in Our Hands?

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pp. 111-114

Big changes are coming to North Carolina’s economy in the twenty-first century—changes that will affect how we live, where we will live, what we will do in our jobs, how much we will earn, how we are educated and trained, how we are assisted and supported, how we will move around, and what fuels we will use to transport us, heat and cool us, and power our industries. ...

Acknowledgments

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pp. 115-116

Notes

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pp. 117-166

Index

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pp. 167-176