Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

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pp. vii-viii

We live in an increasingly interconnected world. It is a world of global manufacturing and trade, international travel and almost instant communication, shared climate change and epidemics, and far-flung wars and campaigns of terror. And it is a world of different languages, different narratives, different standards of living. ...

Part I. Reconstructing Cosmopolitan Ideals

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Introduction

Jessica Wahman

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pp. 3-8

The chapters in this first part confront key topics to be addressed by a contemporary cosmopolitanism. All suggest that cosmopolitanism is an orientation worth considering, and some argue explicitly in favor of the position. Many of the authors draw our attention to an increasingly globalized world and suggest this is a prominent reason for taking cosmopolitanism seriously. ...

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1. Déjà Vu All Over Again?: The Challenge of Cosmopolitanism

John Lysaker

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pp. 9-21

At one time, let’s say 1990, it seemed as if relational ontologies marked a significant advance for those trying to think past the limits of liberal political theory and the more general posture of the modern subject. Appreciating the interconnectedness of all things, and thus the dependency of any given thing, was taken to have more or less clear ethical-political implications, ...

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2. Home, Hospitality, and the Cosmopolitan Address

Noëlle McAfee

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pp. 22-35

Marshall McLuhan began his curious little book of 1967, The Medium Is the Massage, with an epigraph by Alfred North Whitehead: “The major advances in civilization are processes that all but wreck the societies in which they occur.”1 For McLuhan’s purposes, the meaning is clear. The old world became undone by the literacy that the printing press created. ...

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3. Cultural Heritages and Universal Principles

Juan Carlos Pereda Failache

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pp. 36-44

Socialization processes normally imply that we stimulate and praise—or discourage and scorn—some of our desires. And something comparable happens to our beliefs, emotions, interests, and, of course, to our actions. A tradition or cultural heritage is not just something out there; it entails a complex, and usually implicit, social normativity. ...

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4. Not Black or White but Chocolate Brown: Reframing Issues

Jacquelyn Ann K. Kegley

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pp. 45-58

In concert with the classic American philosophical tradition, I argue that philosophical inquiry is best advanced when one avoids black-white thinking and the trap of false alternatives. Much of the contemporary, as well as historical, discussion of cosmopolitanism has framed the debate in terms of a dichotomy between cosmopolitanism and nationalism. ...

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5. Pragmatism and the Challenge of a Cosmopolitan Aesthetics: Framing the Issues

Robert E. Innis

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pp. 59-76

In his Art Without Borders: A Philosophical Exploration of Art and Humanity, Ben-Ami Scharfstein, writing against the background of his deeply pragmatic The Dilemma of Context, contends, “Art is not a single problem, nor does it have a single solution, rational or mystical.”1 Art’s multiple contexts, and types of contexts, are, he argues, the sources of this radical plurality, ...

Part II. Taking Place Seriously

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Introduction

José Medina

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pp. 79-84

The chapters in this part of the book cover various themes concerning making and unmaking places, being placed and displaced, orienting and disorienting yourself and/or others, remembering and forgetting places, connecting and disconnecting places, finding a home and being homeless, and so on. In different ways, all the chapters on place in this part of the book stage an original ...

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6. Toward a Politics of Cohabitation: “Dwelling” in the Manner of Wayfarers

Vincent Colapietro

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pp. 85-106

This chapter is first and foremost a reflection on place, precisely as a verb—that is, not as an antecedently fixed container or enclosure, but as a historically evolved and evolving set of processes and practices. While unavoidably abstract in some respects, it is pointedly political and, to a less extent, polemical. ...

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7. Cosmopolitan Ignorance and “Not Knowing Your Place”

José Medina

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pp. 107-122

As Vincent Colapietro urges us to do, place should be thought of a verb, as referring to activities, and more specifically shared activities or social practices. As Colapietro puts it: “Whatever else places are, they are sites of activity, loci for dramas, above all, those improvised scenes in which the unintended consequences of our most careful deliberations quickly acquire ...

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8. America and Cosmopolitan Responsibility: Some Thoughts on an Itinerant Duty

Jeff Edmonds

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pp. 123-138

The question of the nature of cosmopolitanism and its relationship to place is not just a question of how these logical categories might be properly determined and defined. While it would be perhaps convenient for philosophers to share a definition of cosmopolitanism and come to agreement on its limits and possibilities, philosophical convenience or agreement ...

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9. Loss of Place

Megan Craig

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pp. 139-160

Each of us has a place we presently occupy, a place from whence we came, and an ambiguous place toward which we are heading. Even if the present place is makeshift or temporary, if one is a refugee or homeless, being in the world entails occupying, however minimally, some shred of ground. Heidegger underscored this fact of existence by the term Dasein: “being-there.” ...

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10. The Loss of Confidence in the World

Josep E. Corbí

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pp. 161-180

In this chapter, I focus on the experience of torture and, more specifically, on Jean Améry’s account of it in his book At the Mind’s Limits.1 There he claims that the loss of confidence in the world is the most devastating effect he experienced as a victim of torture. I thus explore what cosmopolitan aspiration may be revealed by this loss and also discuss whether it is to be discredited as an irrational reaction on the victim’s side ...

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11. Climate Change and Place: Delimiting Cosmopolitanism

Nancy Tuana

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pp. 181-196

Few would contest the claim that climate change raises complex and profound ethical issues including questions of responsibility for climate change related damages, how to act in the face of the deep uncertainties (how much and how fast) regarding the future impacts of climate change, what current generations owe future generations, or how to balance the costs of climate change related mitigation ...

Part III. Reimagining Home and World

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Introduction

John J. Stuhr

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pp. 199-206

To consider seriously cosmopolitan ideals (in Part I of this volume) is to engage universalism of one or more sorts—moral, political, economic, religious, and cultural. It is to take up notions of universal and equal intrinsic worth, the dignity of all persons, and border-blind, history-blind, color-blind, money-blind, gender-blind (and so on) rights and responsibilities. ...

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12. Citizen or Guest?: Cosmopolitanism as Homelessness

Jessica Wahman

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pp. 207-221

The term cosmopolitan typically connotes a “citizen of the world.” Such citizenship suggests a kind of belonging to or being at home in the entire world and, furthermore, enjoying all the rights and privileges while accepting the responsibilities that citizenship implies. Furthermore, to many it suggests participation in a universal common ground of humanity transcending all particularities ...

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13. Cosmopolitan Hope

Jennifer L. Hansen

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pp. 222-234

Presumably, there are many cosmopolitans: the well-traveled, sophisticated, polyglot; the stoic serenely navigating heterogeneous (and fractious) cultural spaces; the migrant following new capital flows; the hospitable host; the religious seeker; or, the peace builder appealing to our shared earth. Cosmopolitans—whatever motive—are mapmakers redrawing the boundaries of the familiar in order to seek what is better.1 ...

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14. Hospitality or Generosity?: Cosmopolitan Transactions

Cynthia Gayman

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pp. 235-248

While “there are many cosmopolitanisms,” as Jennifer Hansen notes in Chapter 13, “Cosmopolitan Hope,” a feature linking them in their various contemporary instantiations is a certain requisite generosity of perception, an openness to the unfamiliar, foreign, or strange.1 Perceptual generosity puts no additional demand on the function of eyesight, ...

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15. On Cosmopolitan Publics and Online Communities

Erin C. Tarver

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pp. 249-263

It is no secret that life in the twenty-first century happens, for many of us, in a “place” that defies traditional conceptions of place, community, and communication—namely, in the nebulous and Heraclitean world of the internet. Not only information but socialization and political life exist online; for many people, in fact, those relationships and conversations accessed via electronic mediums constitute the majority of all such interactions. ...

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16. A New “International of Decent Feelings”?: Cosmopolitanism and the Erasure of Class

William S. Lewis

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pp. 264-279

Fifteen years before he renewed philosophical Marxism with his re-readings of Marx and Lenin, Louis Althusser authored a polemic titled “The International of Decent Feelings.” The student philosopher who wrote this piece had yet to renounce his Christianity and was heavily influenced by Catholic theology as well as by Hegelian interpretations of Marx. ...

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17. Somewhere, Dreaming of Cosmopolitanism

John J. Stuhr

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pp. 280-296

The problem of cosmopolitanism and provincialism is the longstanding philosophical problem of the one and the many in that problem’s only real—that is, political—form. In its traditional meanings and forms, provincialism is no solution to this problem. Just as Winston Churchill once observed that the best argument against democracy is a brief conversation with the average vote ...

Bibliography

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pp. 297-314

Index

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pp. 315-319