Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

I was introduced to Kúnlé Ajíbádé—executive editor of The News (Lagos) and, now, collaborator and very good friend—when Tẹjú Ọláníyan intervened on my behalf as I sought contacts in Lagos for leads on the sections of the book that deal with the praise magazine (see chapter 6) and book launch (see the Conclusion). ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xxvi

In this book, I conceive of culturally significant ideas, objects, and motions in two ways. The first concerns the gestures that people who self­ identify as Yorùbá construe and circulate to articulate their proclamations to others, both in ordinary circumstances and at critical life passages such as birth, death, and marriage. The second principle of cultural being that I deploy requires that those who identify as non­ Yorùbá concede as intelligible, ...

read more

1. “Writing” and “Reference” in Ifá Divination Chants

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-25

In July 1897, Bishop Charles Phillips, a leading member of the Yorùbá-speaking clergy of the Anglican Church in Nigeria, wrote a preface to the book of Ifá divination stories collected and annotated by Rev. E. M. Lijadu, a pioneering missionary in the Òndó region of southwestern Nigeria. Phillips especially praised Lijadu’s commentaries on the theological ramifications of the stories ...

read more

2. Culture, Meaning, Proverbs (For Oyekan Owomoyela, in Memoriam)

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-47

From the most banal banter to the highly stylized, ritual texts, proverbs are the most frequently invoked art form of asserting cultural being. In film, storytelling, drama, comedy, and tragedy, proverbs are cited straightforwardly as if they are inscriptions of cultural wisdom, usually prefaced with the formulaic introduction “The Yorùbá concluded thusly” ...

read more

3. Reading, Writing, and Epistemic Instability in Fágúnwà’s Novels

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 48-74

The only episode about divination of any type in all D. O. Fágúnwà’s novels happens in the first one, Ògbójú Ọdẹ Nínú Igbó Irúnmale, when on his second lone venture into the place Wole Soyinka rendered in English as “the forest of a thousand daemons,” the protagonist, Àkàrà-ògùn, tries to decipher what the day has in store for him by casting kola nut seeds. ..

read more

4. Sex, Gender, and Plot in Fágúnwà’s Adventures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-94

Two main thought streams dominate considerations of sex and gender ethics in Fágúnwà’s works. One asserts that the stories “negate [the] marginalization of females and reject the peripheral roles assigned to female folk in the post-colonial Yoruba society” (Adeyemi, “Representation of Gender in Fiction,” 97). ...

read more

5. Akínwùmí Ìṣolá’s Ẹfúnṣetán Aníwúrà and Yorùbá Woman-Being

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-119

One Yorùbá woman seeks, finds, and wields mighty power in Ẹfúnṣetán Aníwúrà, Akínwùmí Ìṣolá’s tragedy of the eponymous character’s adventures in deadly power play. As with Fágúnwà’s adventures, however, the play’s reception is riven with conflicts regarding how construals of inscribed ways of proper female-being should be experienced in commentary-bound circulations of daily life: ...

read more

6. Photography and the Panegyric in Contemporary Yorùbá Culture

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-164

With a title that proclaims a throaty dedication to praise, predominantly red glossy covers, and every page filled with compilations of adulatory, colored photographs taken on festive occasions, Ovation magazine works very hard to put its subjects in the best light. Its many clones based in Lagos— ...

read more

Conclusion: Book Launches as Cultural Affirmation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-182

Practical aspirations—as to schooling success, professional advancement, and rewarding spiritual favors, for example—drive publishing and reading practices in contemporary southwestern Nigeria, going by the dominant patterns of titles on the shelves of the few notable bookshops that remain open in Lagos, Ìbàdàn, and Ìlọrin, three major cities with very large Yorùbá-speaking populations. ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-192

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-200

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF