Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

We are grateful to the contributors in this collection for sharing the stories of their experiences in higher education, experiences that reflect not only the best of academe (the spaces of innovation, the partnerships that blossom from collaboration, the protections of tenure that foster...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xxviii

Sustainability has become “ one of those words,” equally at home in a McDonald’s ad as in high-level talks on climate change at the United Nations, under whose auspices it emerged in 1987. As the focus of the World Commission on Environment and Development’s Our Common Future, sustainability...

Part 1. Confronting the Challenges of the Places We Are

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Unrooted: Dislocation and the Teaching of Place

Jennifer L. Case

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pp. 3-16

My first spring as a graduate student in English, thirteen other graduate students and I took a seminar on environmental criticism. We met in a basement classroom at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, a land grant university located next to the banks, businesses, and restaurants of the...

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By the Lumbee River with Chad Locklear’s “Swamp Posse”

Jane Haladay and Scott Hicks

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pp. 17-34

We’ve just begun discussing the fijirst piece of literature we teach in our Environmental Literature course, Chad Locklear’s “Swamp Posse” (2006). It’s inevitable that more than one student in the class will have this question about one of the Lumbee terms Locklear includes in his short story...

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Getting Your Feet Wet: Teaching Climate Change at Ground Zero

Daniel Spoth

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pp. 35-58

On a muggy day in May 2013, the environmentalist, author, and activist Bill McKibben took the stage at Eckerd College’s fijiftieth commencement in St. Petersburg, Florida. The graduation tent stood no more than a hundred yards across a manicured lawn from Eckerd’s South Beach and the adjacent...

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Cutting through the Smog: Teaching Mountaintop Removal at a University Powered by Coal

Brianna R. Burke

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pp. 59-76

Stepping onto the campus of Iowa State University, you can’t help but notice the impressive ancient trees, the dignifijied brick and stone buildings, the flawless work of what seems like hundreds of groundskeepers, and, if you care about the environment, the enormous energy plant lurking on the edge...

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Teaching about Biodiversity and Extinction in a Thawing Alaska: A Reflection

Jennifer Schell

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pp. 77-94

Alaska’s 663,300 square miles contain a diverse array of ecosystems, including temperate rainforests, rocky coastlines, volcanic archipelagoes, alpine meadows, boreal forests, glacial rivers, tidal mudflats, and arctic tundra. Although the Far North is not known for its biodiversity...

Part 2. Rethinking What We Do, Remaking Curricular Ecologies

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Letting the Sheets of Memory Blow on the Line: Phantom Limbs, World-Ends, and the Unremembered

Derek Owens

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pp. 97-112

I suppose we’re all haunted now on many levels. Remembrance by its nature seems a form of haunting. As is consciousness itself. During the day we recall faint wisps of last night’s dreams, which have mostly evaporated into air, and strain to pluck the cottony scenes still floating about, like dandelion seeds...

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Student Expectations, Disciplinary Boundaries, and Competing Narratives in a First-Year Sustainability Cohort

Corey Taylor, Richard House, and Mark Minster

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pp. 113-136

During summer 2010, the three of us—all English professors—joined colleagues from engineering, chemistry, mathematics, and student affairs to found the Home for Environmentally Responsible Engineering (HERE), a living-learning community that introduces sustainability to fijirst-year...

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Connecting Urban Students to Conservation through Recovery Plans for Endangered Species

Andrea Olive

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pp. 137-158

Toronto was never a city I expected to live or work in. I was born on the prairies and spent my childhood visiting my grandparents’ farm, skiing in the Rocky Mountains, and watching the sun rise across the huge open sky on my way to early morning swim practice. I was extraordinarily lucky to...

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Teaching Critical Food Studies in Rural North Carolina

Keely Byars-Nichols

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pp. 159-178

In his 2012 essay titled “Sustainability and the Humanities: An Extensive Pleasure,” Daniel Phillipon asks, “How might the humanities make the case for sustainability in the United States, how might sustainability supersede other concerns as a presiding paradigm for environmental studies, and how might...

Part 3. Reinhabiting and Restoring Who and Where We Are

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Mindfulness, Sustainability, and the Power of Personal Practice

Jesse Curran

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pp. 181-200

Adjunct professor. PhD in English, specialization in environmental poetics. Afffijiliated with departments or programs in English, sustainability studies, writing, honors, and fijirst-year experience.
Yet when it comes to identifying as a practitioner of yoga, I’ve been told to think twice....

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Ecological Journeys: From Higher Education to the Old Farm Trail

Barbara George

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pp. 201-218

I had driven up and down one mountain and was now reoriented, following the steep curve away from Bridgeville, a small borough outside Pittsburgh. Mill houses lined the hill to my left, and to my right, separated by a flimsy guardrail, was a wooded ravine below, gray on this bitingly cold January day. I gripped...

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Meeting across Ontologies: Grappling with an Ethics of Care in Our Human-More-than-Human Collaborative Work

Bawaka Country, including Laklak Burarrwanga, Ritjilili Ganambarr, Merrkiyawuy Ganambarr-Stubbs, Banbapuy Ganambarr, Djawundil Maymuru, Kate Lloyd

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pp. 219-244

Our research collective fijirst explicitly talked about wetj on the beach at Bawaka, an Indigenous Yolŋu homeland in Northeast Arnhem Land, Australia, in 2010. We were collaboratively writing a book about Yolŋu mathematics—a book that was aimed at discussing the underlying patterns...

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Ganawendamaw: Anishinaabe Concepts of Sustainability

Margaret Noodin

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pp. 245-260

Observe, connect, know yourself and every other self and all that is no self. Dream of ways to rekindle in darkness and move forward in the brilliant dawn. Visualize, celebrate, confront, grow, decompose and transform. Sustain yourself and others. Oganawaabanjigewag, niganawaabandizo...

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Epilogue

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pp. 261-266

The years since 2006, when this collection’s editors arrived at the University of North Carolina, Pembroke, have seen a steady stream of national and global environmental catastrophes: the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Fukushima Daichii nuclear disaster, Hurricanes Sandy and Matthew...

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Contributors

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pp. 267-272

Bawaka Country, including Laklak Burarrwanga, Ritjilili Ganambarr, Merrkiyawuy Ganambarr-Stubbs, Banbapuy Ganambarr, Djawundil Maymuru, Kate Lloyd, Sarah Wright, Sandie Suchet-Pearson, and Paul Hodge, is an Indigenous and non-Indigenous, human-more-than-human research collective. Laklak, Ritjilili, Merrkiyawuy...

Index

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pp. 273-278