Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Epigraph

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pp. i-vi

Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

U. S. Congressman John D. Dingell

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pp. ix-x

As a young boy growing up in the Detroit Metropolitan Area, I spent countless hours walking the shoreline of the Detroit River with my father, hunting in its many marshes, and fishing in its many spawning, feeding, and nursery areas. Those personal experiences with my father, a passionate outdoorsman, helped to shape my views on the importance of conservation and undoubtedly led me to use my position as a U.S. Congressman to promote responsible stewardship of the God-given natural resources entrusted...

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Editorial

Mohiuddin Munawar

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pp. xi-xvi

The Aquatic Ecosystem Health and Management Society (AEHMS) publishes both a primary international journal, Aquatic Ecosystem Health and Management, and peer reviewed books under the banner of the Ecovision World Monograph Series.

Since 1995, the Ecovision series has published 23 books (see www.aehms.org; Table I). The series focuses on the linkages between human society, ecology, economy, ecosystems and the environment, and publishes comprehensive and holistic treatments of a variety of...

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Prologue

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pp. xvii-xxviii

In 1881 at the age of 17, Paul Kroegel moved from Germany to a homestead in Florida, USA overlooking Pelican Island in the Indian River. From his home, he could see the picturesque Pelican Island, a 2.02-ha (five-acre) mangrove haven where thousands of brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) and other water birds would roost and nest. It was an incredible sight of avian biodiversity and requisite nesting and roosting habitats comparable to many of the important birding areas featured through global ecotourism excursions...

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Chapter 1. From Resource Abuse to Recovery of Detroit River's Charismatic Megafauna

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pp. 1-26

Most people have heard of the Laurentian Great Lakes. But not everyone recognizes how truly globally significant they are. Newcomers are always in awe of their size and sailors are frequently terrified of their power. The Great Lakes contain approximately 22,900 cubic kilometers (5,500 cubic miles) of water, representing nearly one-fifth of the standing freshwater on the Earth's surface. The Great Lakes drainage basin covers more land than England, Scotland, and Wales combined, and the lakes together have over 17,000...

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Chapter 2. From Conservation Vision to Establishment of an International Wildlife Refuge

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pp. 27-48

If you have ever planned a big project, you know how difficult the initial planning can be. People often call the initial project planning phase "fuzzy" because it lacks a clear and compelling vision, and common expectations. In the early stages of project planning it is not uncommon for some stakeholders to have one vision and one set of expectations, while others have completely different ones. A clear vision is not a vague wish or dream, but a picture so clear and strong that it will help make the desired outcome real. For that reason, vision...

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Chapter 3. Roots of the Refuge: Standing on the Shoulders of Michigan United Conservation Clubs, Pointe Mouillee Waterfowl Festival, and the United Auto Workers

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pp. 49-72

As noted in Chapter 2, the "Conservation Vision for the Lower Detroit River Ecosystem" (Metropolitan Affairs Coalition 2001) became the catalyst for the establishment of the Detroit River International Wildlife Refuge (DRIWR) in 2001. Although the refuge originated in 2001, it clearly has its roots in earlier efforts of conservation clubs, sportsmen's clubs, and industrial unions. This chapter will document how North America's only international wildlife refuge was built on the foundation established by the Michigan United Conservation...

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Chapter 4. Public-Private Partnerships for Conservation

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pp. 73-96

A partnership is generally understood to be an arrangement where parties agree to cooperate to advance their mutual interests. Sometimes a partnership is established because the desired task cannot be accomplished alone or to avoid duplication of efforts; other times a partnership is formed to work more effectively, more efficiently, and more economically. For those who have worked in very challenging partnerships, they will probably find humor in the often cited quote by Quentin Crisp:

It is explained that all relationships require a little give and take. This is untrue. Any partnership...

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Chapter 5. Creating a New Waterfront Porch for People and Wildlife

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pp. 97-126

It was early morning when our boat left the Bay View Yacht Club on Conner Creek in Detroit. As we headed downstream to the confluence with the Detroit River, we were greeted with a spectacular view of Lake St. Clair, Peche Isle at the head of the Detroit River on the Canadian side, and Belle Isle - the 396.6-hectare (980-acre) crown jewel of Detroit's park system initially designed by world-renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead. We were truly awestruck at how beautiful the river was. The weather conditions...

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Chapter 6. Transformation of an Industrial Brownfield into a Gateway to the International Wildlife Refuge

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pp. 127-144

The first time I entered the site I had an eerie feeling. Barbed wire fences encircled the entire site, including the shoreline of the Detroit River. It was flat as a pancake, with few trees. The few trees that were present were along the fence lines, as if standing guard and warning people to stay out of this industrial brownfield. A brownfield is an abandoned or underused industrial or commercial site whose future use is affected by historical residual contamination. Between the barbed wire and my perception of the perimeter trees standing...

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Chapter 7. If You Build It, They Will Come

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pp. 145-160

A nearly two-meter-Iong female fish, that has remained virtually unchanged since prehistoric times, leaves the deep waters of Lake Huron and heads south in search of her natal spawning grounds in the Detroit River with a determination and intensity similar to that of a snow goose that leaves its summer breeding grounds in the arctic tundra and annually migrates over 4,800 km (3,000 miles) to warmer wintering areas in North America. Using her strongly muscled body and shark-like tail, she slowly and methodically swims toward the...

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Chapter 8. Citizen Science and Stewardship

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pp. 161-182

Whether it's counting birds, listening for frogs, spotting salamanders, collecting butterflies or dragonflies, identifying aquatic invertebrates collected from sediments, gauging stream flow, or measuring water quality - there is an increasing and ardent need for citizens to participate in science. Further, natural resource and environmental management agencies are frequently challenged with limited resources to properly collect and analyze data to adequately inform natural resource decision-making. Therefore, need for and interest in...

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Chapter 9. Reconnecting People Back to the Land and Water Through Outdoor Recreation

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pp. 183-198

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (1999), in its vision document titled "Fulfilling the Promise," recognized that the heritage of the National Wildlife Refuge System is intertwined with the will of concerned citizens. By extension, that means that the heritage of the Oetroit River International Wildlife Refuge (ORIWR) is intertwined with the will of concerned residents of southeast Michigan and southwest Ontario. Therefore, every effort must be made to educate and inform citizens about how they are part of the land/ecosystem, not...

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Chapter 10. Lessons Learned

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pp. 199-228

Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) was an American journalist, social critic, a public administrator, and famous landscape designer. Today, he is popularly considered the father of American landscape architecture. Most people know Olmstead through the physical legacy of stunning landscapes, including: Central Park in New York City; Belle Isle in Detroit; the United States' first and oldest coordinated system of public parks and parkways in Buffalo, New York; the United States' oldest state park called the Niagara Reservation in...

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Epilogue

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pp. 229-236

A surprise is a feeling of sudden wonder or amazement at something unexpected. It is my hope that you have been pleasantly surprised to learn that the Detroit River is no longer one of the most polluted rivers in North America, that its environmental improvements have led to one of the most dramatic ecological recoveries in North America, and that now, along with western Lake Erie, it is part of the only international wildlife refuge in North America...

Glossary

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pp. 237-253

About the Author

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p. 254