Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

The Weje- ebis project team gratefully acknowledges financial support from the Administration for Native Americans, from the Mellon Foundation’s Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas, from Middlebury College’s Undergraduate Research Office, and from research funds from Middlebury...

Contributors

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pp. xiii-xvi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-14

The epigraph with which we begin this preface is part of a longer creation story that was performed in 1902 in Genesee, California, by a man who was known by the names Tom Young and Hánc’ibyjim (pronounced Han-cheebuh-yim). He was well known as a storyteller, raconteur, and ceremonial leader...

Part One. Community Renewal

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1. This Is Where We Belong: Maidu Histories on a Shared California Landscape

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pp. 17-31

Roxie Peconom was more than one hundred years old in 1956 when she spoke these words (adapted from Shipley 1963, 66–67). Initially reluctant to participate, she had been persuaded by other Maidu elders—Leone Morales, Maym Gallagher, and George Peconom—to gather at the Gallagher home to...

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2. Placing Communities, Languages, and Stories on the Contemporary Landscape

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pp. 32-60

This passage is excerpted from Hánc’ibyjm’s stories (chap. 5, lines 12–23). In this passage Hánc’ibyjim portrays K’ódojapem as he sends out runners to call a gathering of people from villages distributed across a particular landscape. Tom Young sets this passage in the long ago and depicts an indigenous world...

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3. Wéjenim Bíspadà: A Brief History of Maidu Language Keepers and

Kenneth Holbrook

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pp. 61-74

The purpose of this chapter is to share a history of some of the central figures of Maidu language revitalization during the past 120 years and to pay tribute to their dedication. I also introduce some ideas about the variety of Maidu language work accomplished during this period, which I hope will inspire the...

Part Two. Creation Narratives of

4. Púktim / Creation

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pp. 77-107

5. Hompajtotokymc’om / The Adversaries

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pp. 108-140

6. Hybýkʼym Masý Wónom / Love and Death

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pp. 141-163

7. K’ódojapem Bom / Worldmaker’s Trail

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pp. 164-200

Part Three. Pronunciation and Lessons

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8. How to Pronounce Maidu

William Shipley

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pp. 203-206

Like most languages in the world, Maidu had no writing system in the old days. In order to write things down in Maidu, it is necessary to make up an accurate system so that there will be a letter for each Maidu sound. We can use any letters at all for this as long as we know what sound each letter stands...

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9. Reading the Maidu Language: Nine Beginning Lessons

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pp. 207-215

Notice that there are no words for the or a or an in Maidu: Aním kak’án wépam. This means: There is the Coyote. Or it means: There is a coyote...

Appendix: Place Names and Character Names in the Stories

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pp. 216-218

Bibliography

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pp. 219-224

Index

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pp. 225-229