Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

In addition to the National Endowment for the Humanities, which provided us with an eighteen-month Scholarly Editions and Translations grant to work on this project, we would like to express our deep gratitude to the following people for their kind assistance: Michael Winship, Alisha Knight, ...

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xxxii

Sutton E. Griggs made an unprecedented attempt to establish a print culture among southern blacks through the writing, producing, and marketing of five politically engaged long works of fiction that appeared in book form between 1899 and 1908. Using the novel in original and audacious ways, he examined the interrelationships among race, politics, economics, ...

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Textual Note

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pp. xxxiii-xxxviii

Griggs published The Hindered Hand in three forms: a 303-page printing without illustrations; a 303-page printing with fifteen inserted illustrations by Robert E. Bell; and a 333-page printing, identified on the title page as the “Third Edition—Revised,” with Bell’s illustrations printed on integral leaves.1 ...

The Hindered Hand

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pp. 1-2

Dedication

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pp. 3-4

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Solemnly Attested

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p. 5

Upon a matter of such tremendous importance to the American people as is the subject herein treated, it is perhaps due our readers to let them know how much of fact disports itself through these pages in the garb of fiction. ...

Illustrations: By Robert E. Bell

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p. 6

Contents

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pp. 7-10

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Tuning the Lyre

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pp. 11-14

In the long ago when the earth was in process of formation, it must have been that those forces of nature most expert in the fashioning of the beautiful were ordered to come together as collaborators and give to the world Almaville!4 ...

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Chapter I: Occurrences that Puzzle

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pp. 15-19

To the pagan yet remaining in man it would seem that yon railroad train plunging toward the Southland is somehow conscious of the fact that it is playing a part in events of tremendous import, for observe how it pierces the darkness with its one wild eye, cleaves the air with its steely front and causes wars and thunders to creep into the dreams of the people by whose homes it makes its midnight rush. ...

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Chapter II: His Face was her Guide

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pp. 20-23

“This is a rich man’s war and a poor man’s fight.” Such is said to have been the character of the sentiment that was widespread in the ranks of the Confederate army during the late Civil War.
Be that as it may, it is very evident that the highest interest of the “poor whites” who bore the brunt of the fighting was to be conserved by the collapse rather than the triumph of the cause for which they fought with unsurpassed gallantry ...

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Chapter III: Wherein Foresta First Appears

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pp. 24-27

When the young woman who had committed herself to Bud Harper’s care awoke the next morning she saw standing near her a tall, slender, Negro girl, of a dark brown complexion.
“My name is Foresta,” said the girl, showing the tips of her beautiful white teeth. Her lips were thin, her nose prettily chiseled, her skin smooth, ...

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Chapter IV: The Ways of a Seeker After Fame

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pp. 28-30

This world of ours, thought of in comparison with man the individual, is so very, very large; its sons and daughters departed, now on hand and yet to come, form such an innumerable host; the ever-increasing needs of the living are so varied and urgent; the advance cry of the future bidding us to prepare for its coming is so insistent; the contest for supremacy, raging everywhere, ...

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Chapter V: Rather Late in Life to be Still Nameless

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pp. 31-36

On the morrow following our ride into Almaville on the passenger train, toward twilight Ensal Ellwood sat upon the front porch of his pretty little home, a sober look in his firm, kindly eyes. By his side sat his aged mother, whose sweet dark face of regular features was crowned with hair that was now white from the combined efforts of time and sorrow. ...

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Chapter VI: Friendly Enemies

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pp. 37-40

It has always been a mooted question with Ensal as to whether he did or did not sleep the night of Tiara’s call at his residence. But he has ever stood ready to take oath or affirmation that, whether waking or sleeping, Tiara was constantly in his thoughts that night. And when turning his face toward the window the following morning he saw streaks of golden sunshine stretched across the floor, ...

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Chapter VII: Officers of the Law

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pp. 41-46

“Hold on, there!” said one of a group of white boys on their way to school. The command was addressed to a Negro lad fourteen years of age. “Where are you going?” asked the self-appointed spokesman of the white boys. The Negro lad looked sullenly at the white boy.
“No need of clouding up; you can’t rain,” said the white boy. ...

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Chapter VIII: A Messenger that Hesitates

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pp. 47-49

Mrs. Crump sat in her room, her elbows propped up on her knees and her cheeks resting on her hands. The death of Henry, her only boy, was indeed a severe blow to her, but at this particular moment she was bearing up well under it, reserving her strength by a supreme effort of her will to the end that she might comfort her husband when he became aware of the tragedy. ...

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Chapter IX: A Plotter is He

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pp. 50-52

Neighbors came and took charge of the body of Ford Crump. The body of Henry was brought home and received the same kindly attention. Foresta and her mother now set forth to make arrangements for the burial. The undertakers asked for a lien on their place as a guarantee of the payment of the debt. ...

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Chapter X: Arabelle Seabright

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pp. 53-55

“Arabelle, I am not going to have a thing to do with this whole matter. Suppose the bottom falls out and we are detected. Just imagine my fate.”
“Detected?” hissed Mrs. Arabelle Seabright, turning a scornful gaze upon her husband. “You talk as though we have committed or are about to commit some crime. You just stay in your place, please, and leave matters to me.” ...

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Chapter XI: Unusual for a Man

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pp. 56-58

Never in all of human history was an ambitious woman more satisfied with the progress of her plans than was Mrs. Arabelle Seabright. In due time the Hon. H. G. Volrees had formed her acquaintance and it was not long before they had come to an understanding. Eunice demurred not in the least when it was made known to her that she was to be Mrs. H. G. Volrees. ...

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Chapter XII: A Honeymoon out of the Usual Order

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pp. 59-63

The much heralded Volrees-Seabright marriage is at last a reality, and a morning train is now bearing the distinguished couple through the beautiful mountain scenery of the state, en route to an Atlantic seaport, whence they are to set sail for an extended tour through the Old World. ...

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Chapter XIII: Shrewd Mrs. Crawford

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pp. 64-67

Between Tiara and Ensal there existed a barrier which had seemingly prevented a development of the ties that all who knew the two expected with full assurance.
The attitude of a Negro on the social question as between the races was no child’s play with Tiara. It struck at the very root of the deepest convictions of her soul, and she was firmly resolved to allow no Negro into the inner circle ...

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Chapter XIV: Alene and Ramon

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pp. 68-70

Alene Daleman and Ramon Mansford stood within the vestibule of the former’s home. Ramon’s arm was around Alene’s waist and her beautiful black eyes were upturned to his, as if to say, “Fathom the love we tell of, if you can.” Down stoops Ramon and plants a fervent, lingering kiss upon the lips of the girl he loves, saying, as he stroked her hair, ...

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Chapter XV: Unexpected Developments

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pp. 71-75

According to previous engagement, Mr. Arthur Daleman, Sr., Alene’s father, and Ramon Mansford, her affianced, went forth together for an early morning walk. Arm in arm the somewhat aged Southerner and the young Northerner sauntered forth.
“My boy,” said Mr. Daleman, “I have thought to have a talk with you concerning the dark shadow ...

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Chapter XVI: An Eager Searcher

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pp. 76-79

Up and down the street on which he lived, Ramon Mansford, the affianced of Alene Daleman, walked as one in a trance. Night was coming and as the shadows deepened the bitterness deepened in his soul.
“Think of it! my father sleeps in an unmarked grave somewhere in the South, and I know that the hope of freeing the slave actuated him to enlist in the army. ...

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Chapter XVII: Peculiar Divorce Proceedings

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pp. 80-82

“Dilsy Brooks, would you ’low me er few wurds wid you?”
Dilsy Harper, Bud’s mother, paused in her knitting, pulled her spectacles a little further down on her nose, and peered over them at Silas Harper, her husband, who had just entered her room and stood with his hat in his hand. ...

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Chapter XVIII: Mists That Vanish

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pp. 83-86

In his far away peaceful Northern home, Norfleet, friend of Ramon Mansford, received the following letter: ...

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Chapter XIX: The Fugitives Flee Again

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pp. 87-90

When Bud Harper and Foresta, on the night following their elopement, returned to Almaville, Bud took Foresta by her home to break the news to her mother, leaving her at the gate, while he went to his home to tell his mother. Finding a corpse in his house and noting the terror that his appearance seemed to inspire, Bud left and ran back to Foresta’s home. ...

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Chapter XX: The Blaze

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pp. 91-96

Little Melville Brant stamped his foot on the floor, looked defiantly at his mother, and said, in the whining tone of a nine-year old child,
“Mother, I want to go.”
“Melville, I have told you this dozen times that you cannot go,” r ...

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Chapter XXI: Planning to Act

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pp. 97-98

On the morning following the Maulville tragedy, before Ensal was out of bed Earl was tugging viciously at his door bell. Recognizing the note of distress in the clang of the bell, Ensal arose, quickly attired himself and hurried to the door.
“Oh, it is my good friend, Earl. Glad—” ...

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Chapter XXII: The Two Pathways

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pp. 99-111

The day wore on, and about dusk Earl returned to Ensal’s home, and the two at once entered upon the consideration of the grave matter that was to be the subject of their conference.
“Before giving my plan, Ensal, I will present the course of reasoning that leads me up to the conclusion that it is the one path to pursue,” began Earl. ...

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Chapter XXIII: They Grapple

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pp. 112-115

Almaville is asleep, watched by the quiet moon, now about to disappear, and the far off silent stars.
Upon the bridge from which hundreds had seen little Henry Crump driven to his death; where the majesty of the law had been trampled under foot in the murder and mutilation of Dave Harper—upon this bridge now stood Ensal awaiting the coming of Earl ...

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Chapter XXIV: Out of Joint with his Times

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pp. 116-123

“Jedge, I’d lack to mek’ er few dimes. Ken I peddle limonade nigh de co’t ‘ouse do’, sah, yer honah?”
The judge looked with a kindly eye upon the rather small, aged Negro, who made the above request. The look of the man was so appealing and his voice so sad of tone that the judge was moved to grant the request. ...

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Chapter XXV: A Joyful Farewell

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pp. 124-126

Mr. Seabright sat upright in bed and rubbed his eyes. The gas was burning and there sat a man in one corner of his bedroom, turning a rifle over and over, in a cool manner, a keen look of satisfaction in his eyes.
“Am I dreaming? O, I am dreaming!” said Mr. Seabright, trying to thus reassure himself; but a man was sitting in a chair in the corner, all as plain as day. ...

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Chapter XXVI: Gus Martin

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pp. 127-130

Gus Martin, for it was he who was Mr. Seabright’s visitor, saw to it that every window and door of the house was properly barred, and then repaired to the tower which commanded every approach to the house. To his very great surprise he found the tower a veritable arsenal with ammunition in abundance and death dealing devices of the most improved types. ...

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Chapter XXVII: Tiara Mystifies Us

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pp. 131-134

Tiara was sitting on the front porch of her home gazing pensively out upon the blue hills that fringed the distant horizon.
On the day previous she had been able to pronounce the wounded Earl well and he had gone forth solemnly pledged to no longer rebel against the overwhelming desire of the Negro race ...

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Chapter XXVIII: Poor Fellow

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pp. 135-137

The whole of the night following the Gus Martin tragedy was spent by Ensal in sorrowful meditation, as he restlessly walked to and fro in his room.
The Rev. Percy G. Marshall had been an outspoken friend of the Negro. The white South, Ensal felt, had at one time seemed to fetter its pulpit, not allowing it much latitude in dealing with great moral questions that chanced to have an accompanying political aspect. ...

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Chapter XXIX: A Revelation

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pp. 138-141

The fact that Ensal was to resign his church and leave the country was soon known throughout Almaville and filled the hearts of the good people of both races with sore regret. Tiara was amazed.
“Am I no more to him than that,” she asked herself. ...

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Chapter XXX: Mr. A. Hostility

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pp. 142-144

It will be recalled that in a very early chapter we saw a cadaverous looking white man, wearing a much worn suit of clothes, making a sketch of Ensal’s home, as the latter was going out to make arrangements with Mrs. Crawford for the introduction of Tiara into the best circles of Negro life in Almaville. ...

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Chapter XXXI: Two of a Kind

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pp. 145-149

While Ensal was absent from the room Mr. Hostility had caught sight of a book which he perceived was the work of a rather conspicuous Southern man, who had set for himself the task of turning the entire Negro population out of America.66 He clutched the book eagerly and said to himself: ...

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Chapter XXXII: Working and Waiting

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pp. 150-153

Tiara had gone home from her painful interview with Mrs. Ellwood, and sought the seclusion of her room for the purpose of trying to think out a course of action. She was able, she felt, to make all things plain to Ensal, but in order to do this it would be necessary to make disclosures, which, if given publicity, would very materially affect the welfare of others. ...

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Chapter XXXIII: Back in Almaville

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pp. 154-156

The Hon. H. G. Volrees sat in his office room looking moodily out of the window. Since the desertion of his young bride his life had been one long day of misery to him. His mystification and anger increased with the years, and he had kept a standing offer of a large reward for information leading to the discovery of his wife. ...

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Chapter XXXIV: A Great Day in Court

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pp. 157-166

Long before the hour set for the trial of the alleged Eunice Volrees on the charge of bigamy the court house yard and the corridors were full of people, but, strange to say, the court room in which the trial was to take place, though open, was not occupied. The crowds thus far were composed of Negroes and white people in the middle walks of life, ...

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Chapter XXXV: Eunice! Eunice!

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pp. 167-173

With slow, uncertain step, a wild haunted look in her eye, Eunice, clutching her little boy’s hand until it pained him, moved down the corridor toward the door leading out of the court house. She was about to face the world in the South as a member of the Negro race, and the very thought thereof spread riot within her soul. ...

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Chapter XXXVI: Enthusiastic John Blue

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pp. 174-181

In a room of a hotel in the city in which the sanitarium having charge of Eunice was located, Earl Bluefield sat upon a sofa, his hands, with the fingers tightly interlaced, resting between his knees, his head and shoulders bent forward. The intense, haggard look upon his face told plainly of the painful meditation in which he was engaged. ...

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Chapter XXXVII: Postponing his Shout of Triumph

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pp. 182-184

With ceaseless, tireless energy Earl Bluefield went everywhere in the North during the campaign that followed, assailing the political power in control of the South. The heat of his heart warmed his words and his eloquence thrilled the nation. ...

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Chapter XXXVIII: He Cannot, But he Does!

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pp. 185-188

Ensal Ellwood entered his room in his home in Monrovia, Liberia, West Coast Africa, a thoroughly dejected man. He had just returned from an extended trip in which he took a survey of his work and contemplated the outlook. His investigations had served to increase his hopes as to the possibilities of the African race, but he was nevertheless depressed. ...

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Chapter XXXIX: A Son of the New South

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pp. 189-195

“I understand that a few years ago a Negro man and woman were burned at the stake in this neighborhood. Would you kindly show me the place?”
This request came from Ensal Ellwood and was addressed to young Maul, the attorney who had plead so earnestly for the conviction of the lynchers of Bud and Foresta. A sad look stole over young Maul’s face. ...

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Chapter XL: Sorrow and Gladness

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pp. 196-204

In the parlor of the sanitarium Earl sat awaiting the coming of Eunice, his face telling of the hopes now alive within his heart.
With an exclamation of joy Eunice ran and threw herself into his arms. During her whole stay in the sanitarium the Negro question had not been broached to her and her mind seemed almost normal. ...

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A Hindering Hand: Supplementary to The Hindered Hand: A Review of the Anti-Negro Crusade of Mr. Thomas Dixon, Jr.

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pp. 205-224

From the door of a squalid home, situated mayhaps upon a somewhat decent spot in a marsh or upon the very poorest of soil, the poor white man of the South, prior to his emancipation by the Civil War, looked out upon a world whose honors and emoluments cast no favoring glances in his direction. ...

Notes to the Text

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pp. 225-236

Appendix A: The Original Version of Chapter 31

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pp. 237-241

Appendix B: Notices for and Reviews of The Hindered Hand, 1905–1906

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pp. 242-257

Appendix C: Sutton E. Griggs, Thomas Dixon Jr., the National Baptist Convention, and The Hindered Hand

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pp. 258-280

Appendix D: The February 7, 1904, Holbert Lynching

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pp. 281-289

Appendix E: African Americans in the Military, Sutton Griggs on Africa, and Race Relations in Nashville

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pp. 290-302

Bibliography

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pp. 303-310

Back Cover

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