Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Frontispiece

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

Carla Sassi and Silke Stroh

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pp. vii-xviii

The century that straddles the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, largely invisible in conventional periodisations, represents in fact a meaningful unit of political and cultural history. 1850 to 1950 is a dramatic period that sees the European political set-up both subject to revolutionary upheavals and transformed through nineteenth-century imperialistic expansion and the rise of twentieth-century ‘modernising’ authoritarian states. It opens soon after the 1848 ‘Springtime of the Peoples’ – the most widespread revolutionary wave in European history – and closes after two world conflicts...

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1. R. B. Cunninghame Graham: Janiform Genius

Cedric Watts

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pp. 1-14

A sunny morning in 1963.

I sat in R. B. Cunninghame Graham’s chair at his desk in his study at Ardoch. That study had remained unchanged since he had last sat there in 1936. All around me on the shelves were first editions of books by Joseph Conrad, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, W. H. Hudson, John Galsworthy, and others. Many of them bore inscriptions to R. B. Cunninghame Graham. My genial host was Admiral Sir Angus Cunninghame Graham, K.B.E., C.B. He was genial partly because I too had served in the Royal Navy, and largely...

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2. The Local and the Global: The Multiple Contexts of Cunninghame Graham

John M. MacKenzie

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pp. 15-31

If ever a life was conducted within diverse and multiple contexts it was surely that of Robert Bontine Cunninghame Graham. These contexts are geographical and environmental, historical and cultural, social and financial, political and literary. This chapter will attempt to touch on all of these, examining some of the themes that seem to emerge from his life, his manifold activities, and his writings. I approach this contextualisation of Graham as a cultural and environmental historian with an interest in empire and in Scotland, as well as, very importantly, the reciprocity between those...

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3. Anti-Slavery Discourse in Three Adventure Stories by R. M. Ballantyne

Jochen Petzold

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pp. 32-46

The relationship between imperialism and popular culture in general, and children’s literature in particular, has often been noted. For example, Martin Green argues that ‘the adventure tales that formed the light reading of Englishmen for two hundred years and more after Robinson Crusoe were, in fact, the energizing myth of English imperialism’, and Patrick Dunae points out that ‘every Christmas hundreds of juvenile adventure novels appeared, novels that romanticized and glorified the exploits of British empire builders’.1 An interesting case in point is provided by the Scotsman...

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4. Don Roberto on Doughty Deeds; or, Slavery and Family History in the Scottish Renaissance

Michael Morris

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pp. 47-63

On the second floor of Edinburgh’s Scottish National Portrait Gallery, in the ‘Age of Improvement’ section, hangs Henry Raeburn’s 1794 portrait of Robert Cunninghame Graham of Gartmore (1735–1797). The caption accompanying the portrait, quoted above, celebrates the key themes of his life in colonial administration, politics, and literature (he acquired the sobriquet ‘Doughty Deeds’ following the popularity of his lyric).1 Slavery is absent from the portrait, though it is mentioned in parentheses in the caption; it is posed as an ironic counterweight to the liberal politics of this...

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5. Empire and Globalisation in John Francis Campbell’s My Circular Notes (1876)

Jessica Homberg-Schramm

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pp. 64-79

In the two volumes of his book My Circular Notes, John Francis Campbell (1821–1885) describes his journey around the world in journal excerpts and letters. Campbell was a scholar who was particularly interested in Celtic culture and in examining traditional folk tales, some of which he recorded in his best-known work Popular Tales of the West Highlands.1 Campbell was an eminent traveller and toured extensively in the Scottish Highlands as well as abroad and allegedly spoke eight languages. His journey around the world, documented in the two volumes of My Circular Notes,2 took place...

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6. Nineteenth-Century Argentine Literature and the Writings of R. B. Cunninghame Graham

Richard Niland

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pp. 80-95

R. B. Cunninghame Graham’s Argentine sketches are characterised by the literary and political traits discernible throughout his oeuvre. These include a sceptical attitude to modernity and progress, an ability to render an evocative autobiographical encounter with changing traditions and cultures, and scrutiny of the evolution of national and imperial politics in Latin America. Graham’s early experiences in Argentina occurred amidst the increasing reach of global networks of economic and cultural exchange in a period when ‘globalization occurred parallel and simultaneously...

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7. R. B. Cunninghame Graham and the Argentinean Angelito

Jennifer Hayward

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pp. 96-111

In 1899 – the same year that Joseph Conrad published Heart of Darkness – R. B. Cunninghame Graham’s short story ‘Un Angelito’ appeared in his collection of fifteen short pieces on the Argentine pampas, The Ipané.1 On the surface, the story is nothing more than a quick sketch of a local tradition: holding a wake to celebrate the death of a young child, or angelito. But this strangely moving little story also speaks to the rapid cultural changes of fin de siècle South America, mapping the disappearance of Argentina’s gaucho culture in tandem with the encroachments of European modernity. In the...

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8. Opposing Racism and Imperialism: Isabella Fyvie Mayo’s Search for Literary Space(s), 1880–1914

Lindy Moore

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pp. 112-127

Scottish author Isabella Fyvie Mayo1 (1843–1914) is relatively unknown in either a literary or a political context. Yet, although she was not a distinguished writer, she deserves recognition for her contribution to the literary minority who opposed racism, imperialism, militarism, and religious intolerance and showed an awareness of the impact of globalisation on both colonised countries and their conquerors in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Concerned from an early age about issues of social...

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9. The Empire in Cunninghame Graham’s Parliamentary Speeches and Early Writings, 1885–1900

Lachlan Munro

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pp. 128-143

It is impossible to separate Cunninghame Graham’s anti-imperialism from his general political philosophy, although the latter can at times be confusing, being both radical and conservative – in his case, neither being inimical with the other. Such apparent paradoxes were not uncommon in his family. His great-great-grandfather, Robert Graham of Gartmore, while Lord Rector of Glasgow University, instituted a medal for the best discourse by a student on political liberty, despite having made his fortune as a slave-owner in Jamaica. Thus, ironically as it would transpire, Cunninghame Graham’s...

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10. White-Skinned Barbarians in Selected Tales by R. B. Cunninghame Graham

John C. McIntyre

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pp. 144-156

To what extent do R. B. Cunninghame Graham’s anti-colonialism and antiimperialism surface in his stories? This chapter attempts to answer this question through case studies of a selection of his tales, with special focus on ‘Buta’, ‘Bristol Fashion’, and ‘A Hegira’ – chosen because they depict encounters between white European-based colonisers and settlers, and native residents in the Middle East, Africa, and Mexico.

‘Buta’ (in the collection Hope, 1910)1 is so charged with political implications that it barely qualifies as a tale. It opens with an idyllic North African...

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11. Violet Jacob on the Captial Relation: Local and Global Flows of Privilege and (Im)mobility

Arianna Introna

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pp. 157-170

Politicians and policymakers operating in the first half of the twentieth century were alert to the ways in which ‘international relations and social structures mutually entail one another’, as Alexander Anievas’s study of class conflict and geopolitics in the first half of the twentieth century demonstrates.1 A similar awareness of the close interconnection between global and local relations of capital and power colours the fiction of Violet Jacob (1863–1946), which treats us to lucid representations of the violence of the capital relation as it plays out at multiple scales. The notion of a ‘capital...

Notes on contributors

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pp. 171-174

Back cover

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p. 175