Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xvi

I could not have written this book without Ras Bupe Karudi, and I must begin by thanking him for trusting me with a history he held sacred. The stack of documents he so graciously delivered to me at the University of Dar es Salaam in 2007 provided the foundation for this project. He joined the ancestors in May 2016 and will not see the published text, ...

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Introduction: Trodding Diaspora

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pp. 1-19

Kisembo Karudi was born in Kingston, Jamaica, during the 1950s, that final decade before the island made the transition from British colony to independent nation-state. The last of six girls raised by her mother, Kisembo spent the early 1970s putting her high school diploma to good use working in a bank, and worshiping in a Methodist church ...

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1. Without Vision the People Perish: The Divine, Regal, and Noble Afrikan Nation

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pp. 20-47

Ras Bupe Karudi set his passport ablaze. As a Rastafarian, the passport of a nation-state in Babylon was merely a document that allowed him to travel. It had never symbolized freedom or belonging. Now that he was home, in Africa, this incendiary act celebrated his literal departure from Babylon—for good. His use of fire to mark the end of his trod through the wilderness was not a random choice. ...

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2. Tanzania: Site of Diaspora Aspiration

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pp. 48-77

In 1971, African American poet, playwright, and activist Amiri Baraka declared that “Tanzania must be one of the strongest examples of African peoples’ will to self-determination existing in the world today.” Having been invited to the tenth anniversary celebration of Tanzania’s independence by Julius Nyerere, Baraka found it “truly inspiring for African Americans to be present to observe intimately ...

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3. The Wages of Blackness: Rastafari and the Politics of Pan-Africanism after Flag Independence

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pp. 78-105

Following the death of Rastafarian reggae superstar Bob Marley, former prime minister of Jamaica Michael Manley reflected on the ways in which Rastafarian ideas and reggae music were inextricably bound, and he acknowledged the impact of this bond on his personal development: “I could never pretend that the lyrics of the protest music, ...

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4. Diasporic Dreams, African Nation-State Realities

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pp. 106-134

In his self-portrait Not Far Away, famed Jamaican Rastafarian artist Ras Daniel Heartman depicts himself looking into the distance toward Africa, with a palpable sense of longing. Repatriation was a dream that Heartman had nurtured as a Rastafarian, and beckoned as an artist. When Tanzania officially opened its doors to Rastafarians in 1985, ...

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5. Sow in Tears, Reap in Joy: Rastafarian Repatriation and the African Liberation Struggle

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pp. 135-168

Tanzania’s official welcome to Rastafarians, granted in December  1985, represented a mighty step forward on their mission to set up Jah Kingdom. They paused to acknowledge that the “battle was progressing,” and had “more faith” that they would put to very good use “the right of entry, leading to citizenship, and land to effect an agriculturally based resettlement.” ...

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6. Strange Bedfellows: Rastafari, C. L. R. James, and the “Africa” in Pan-Africanism

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pp. 169-181

On April 24, 1986, Ras Bupe Karudi wrote to C. L. R. James from Tanzania. Karudi greeted James in “the precious name” of Emperor Haile Selassie I and extended his sincere hope that James had “remained safe and well protected within the caring wings of the Almighty.”1 James emerged as a consistent and dedicated supporter of the repatriation, ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 182-190

Kisembo Karudi left Tanzania for England in 1998. She was no longer willing to tolerate Ras Bupe Karudi’s worsening efforts to exercise complete control over her life, and she was determined to protect and to educate her children. But she was not willing to leave Tanzania for good. Though the marriage was seriously strained, she returned to Tanzania ...

Notes

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pp. 191-224

Bibliography

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pp. 225-244

Index

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pp. 245-254