In this Book

A Different Shade of Justice
summary
In the Jim Crow South, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, and, later, Vietnamese and Indian Americans faced obstacles similar to those experienced by African Americans in their fight for civil and human rights. Although they were not black, Asian Americans generally were not considered white and thus were subject to school segregation, antimiscegenation laws, and discriminatory business practices. As Asian Americans attempted to establish themselves in the South, they found that institutionalized racism thwarted their efforts time and again. However, this book tells the story of their resistance and documents how Asian American political actors and civil rights activists challenged existing definitions of rights and justice in the South.

From the formation of Chinese and Japanese communities in the early twentieth century through Indian hotel owners' battles against business discrimination in the 1980s and '90s, Stephanie Hinnershitz shows how Asian Americans organized carefully constructed legal battles that often traveled to the state and federal supreme courts. Drawing from legislative and legal records as well as oral histories, memoirs, and newspapers, Hinnershitz describes a movement that ran alongside and at times intersected with the African American fight for justice, and she restores Asian Americans to the fraught legacy of civil rights in the South.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Illustrations
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-26
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  1. 1. The Oriental Menace Comes to the South: Anti-Alien Property Laws
  2. pp. 27-69
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  1. 2. Black or White? Asian Americans’ Challenges to Segregated Schools
  2. pp. 70-113
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  1. 3. A Love That Could Not Be Known: Sex, Marriage, and Southern Law
  2. pp. 114-154
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  1. Post-1965 Changes in Asian America
  2. pp. 155-157
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  1. 4. From the Gulf to the Courts: Vietnamese Americans and Human Rights in Texas
  2. pp. 158-194
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  1. 5. Getting Down to Business in Dixie: Indian American Hotel Owners and Entrepreneurial Rights
  2. pp. 195-231
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 232-236
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 237-264
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  1. Select Bibliography
  2. pp. 265-272
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 273-283
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