Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

In many ways writing the second book was both challenging and a welcome change from writing the first. Many people have played important roles in seeing this project from beginning to end, and although I cannot mention everyone in these acknowledgments, this is an undertaking that I could not have completed without the help that I received along the way. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-26

“I’ve never heard a political opinion from a Chinaman,” African American civil rights activist and Mississippi Delta entrepreneur Amzie Moore recounted in a 1967 interview. Although Congress passed and enacted major pieces of legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, ...

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1. The Oriental Menace Comes to the South: Anti-Alien Property Laws

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pp. 27-69

Although his name was Lue Gim Gong, Floridians knew him as the “wonder grower” or “citrus wizard.” A Chinese immigrant, Lue arrived in San Francisco in 1872 when he was twelve years old and quickly went to work with his uncle, an established merchant and labor contractor in the city. When Lue was sixteen, his uncle sent him to North Adams, Massachusetts, to work in a shoe factory. ...

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2. Black or White? Asian Americans’ Challenges to Segregated Schools

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pp. 70-113

In the summer of 1904, the Kentucky state school board found itself faced with an unprecedented question: Are Filipinos “Negroes”? This legal quandary was not part of the conversation earlier in the year when the DuPont Manual Training High School in Louisville agreed to admit four Filipino students into its engineering program. ...

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3. A Love That Could Not Be Known: Sex, Marriage, and Southern Law

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pp. 114-154

“Come on, hurry!” fourteen-year-old Rosa Mae Clower yelled while grabbing her fifteen-year-old friend Frances Hutcheson’s wrist and pulling her through the crowd gathered in front of Atlanta’s downtown McCrory’s drugstore. On the afternoon of April 11, 1932, the popular Filipino yo-yo exhibitionists Fortunatio Annunciatio and Ambia “Amby” Subia ...

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Post-1965 Changes in Asian America

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pp. 155-157

After World War II and through the 1960s, Asian Americans began a transformative process, from being the “yellow peril” to becoming the model minority, and Asian Americans in the South experienced, to some degree, the same transformation. The war and its mottos of fighting for freedom and democracy at home and abroad affected the way Americans viewed their own hypocrisy toward minorities in the United States. ...

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4. From the Gulf to the Courts: Vietnamese Americans and Human Rights in Texas

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pp. 158-194

On an overcast March afternoon, members of the Texas Knights of the Ku Klux Klan cruised the Trinity Bay near Seabrook (a small fishing town approximately half an hour south of Houston) on small fishing vessels as part of a “parade.” Brandishing guns and effigies of minority fishermen who were creating competition for locals, the Klan sent a clear message: ...

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5. Getting Down to Business in Dixie: Indian American Hotel Owners and Entrepreneurial Rights

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pp. 195-231

In the early 1970s, Harish Pattni, a former bellhop who worked his way into hotel management positions in California, arrived in Rockingham, North Carolina (about an hour and a half east of Charlotte), unsure of what opportunities for business might exist in the small town. Pattni found that buying property in California was nearly impossible without significant financial resources and connections, ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 232-236

In November 2008, Floridians who went to the polls to cast their ballots for the next president of the United States also had the chance to reverse eighty years of institutionalized discrimination against Asian Americans in their state. Asian American rights groups in Florida and nationwide distributed pamphlets, sent emails, and spoke to media outlets to build support ...

Notes

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pp. 237-264

Select Bibliography

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pp. 265-272

Index

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pp. 273-283