Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Most of the chapters in this book have been deftly read and commented on by friends and colleagues at numerous universities. I list them in no particular order and sincerely thank them for their care with my ideas. They are Augusta Rohrbach, Sharon Harris, John Ernest, Alan Rice, Joycelyn Moody, Chris Vials, Shawn Salvant, Kate Capshaw, Jerry Phillips, Cassandra Jackson, ...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xx

This project began while I was working on a book about black-white racial passing and reading Moses Roper’s A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery, first published in 1837 in England and republished in the United States and England in 1838. What first caught my eye was Roper’s ability to pass in a variety of ways: for “white” (which his skin color allowed), ...

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Introduction. Visualizing Slavery and Slave Torture

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pp. 1-28

In 1787 Josiah Wedgwood, the famous pottery crafter and Nonconformist, issued a beautiful jasperware medallion with an applied relief of a kneeling enslaved man and the inscription “Am I Not a Man and a Brother?” (see figure 0.1). The image was loosely modeled on that of the seal for the Committee for the Abolition of the Slave Trade, founded in that same year by Thomas Clarkson. ...

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1. Precursors: Picturing the Story of Slavery in Broadsides, Pamphlets, and Early Illustrated Graphic Works about Slavery, 1793–1812

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pp. 29-65

In 1793, Remarks on the Methods of Procuring Slaves, with a Short Account of Their Treatment in the West Indies, an anonymous illustrated broadside, appeared in London. It presents a vividly realistic account of the tortures of slavery, which included branding with irons, shackles, flogging, log yokes, the cruel separation of families, and mouthpieces and collars used to prevent suicide by dirt eating. ...

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2. “These Loathsome Pictures Shall Be Published”: Reconfigurations of the Optical Regime of Transatlantic Slavery in Amelia Opie’s The Black Man’s Lament (1826) and George Bourne’s Picture of Slavery in the United States of America(1834)

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pp. 66-107

In 1827 and 1828, Captain Basil Hall (1788–1844)—a British officer from Scotland whose feats included commanding Royal Navy vessels on hazardous scientific and diplomatic missions, exploring Java in 1813, and interviewing Napoleon on St. Helena in 1817—traveled through North America, using a camera lucida to make illustrations. Patented in 1806 by William Hyde Wollaston, the camera lucida uses prisms that create optical superimpositions of objects onto the surface ...

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3. Entering and Exiting the Sensorium of Slave Torture: A Narrative of the Adventures and Escape of Moses Roper, from American Slavery (1837, 1838) and the Visual Culture of the Slave’s Body in the Transatlantic Abolition Movement

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pp. 108-136

Torture endeavors to dehumanize and render powerless its subjects. It also intends to shred human dignity and condense a person to a body in pain or even to an animal that cannot articulate its torment. As Elaine Scarry famously observed, physical pain habitually entails a “shattering of language,” and a tortured individual is degraded into a state “anterior to language, to the sounds and cries a human being makes before language is learned” ...

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4. Structuring a New Abolitionist Reading of Masculinity and Femininity: The Graphic Narrative Systems of Lydia Maria Child’s Joanna (1838) and Henry Bibb’s Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave (1849)

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pp. 137-174

Previous chapters of this book established that by the mid-1830s, broadsides, comics, cartoons, caricatures, and illustrated books about slavery had been flowing through transatlantic culture for over fifty years. These print modes functioned as a form of visual rhetoric that made arguments through the symbiotic interrelationship between words and pictures. ...

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5. After Tom: Illustrated Books, Panoramas, and the Staging of the African American Enslaved Body in Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) and the Performance Work of Henry Box Brown (1849–1875)

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pp. 175-223

In 2012, the African American performance artist Wilmer Wilson IV created three skins composed of U.S. postage stamps to fit over his body. He walked through the city of Washington, D.C., asking individuals to mail him to a number of other locations (see figures 5.1 and 5.2; color image 11). Wilson’s performance art was an homage to the fugitive slave Henry Box Brown, ...

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Epilogue. The End of Empathy, or Slavery Revisited via Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Artworks

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pp. 224-236

I have argued in this study that antislavery illustrated books published before Uncle Tom’s Cabin sometimes contain a radical reading protocol that moves between words and pictures in an attempt to alter a viewing reader’s horizon of expectations. The goal is to move a reader beyond spectatorship toward a mode of parallel empathy that entails vicarious introspection ...

Appendix. Hierarchical and Parallel Empathy

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pp. 237-238

Notes

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pp. 239-258

Bibliography

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pp. 259-280

Index

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pp. 281-291

Color Plates

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