Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, In Memoriam

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Introduction: The Legacy and Human Cost of Slavery

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

In the spring of 1918, when Mary Turner made what a mob considered “unwise remarks” about the lynching of her husband, who she claimed was innocent of any wrongdoing, “the people took exceptions to her remarks as well as her attitude.”1 Members of the mob, out for vengeance for what they called the “personal outrages and violence, ...

read more

Chapter 1: “Nits Make Lice”: Genocidal Violence in Colonial America

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-33

When Europeans first settled in the New World in the seventeenth century, they came with an inherited set of ideas about how to subdue those whom they would soon declare to be savages. In ancient times, it was not uncommon for enemy combatants to either exterminate their foes or enslave them.1 ...

read more

Chapter 2: A “State of War Continued”: White Fear, Black Warriors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 34-58

English philosopher John Locke predicted that West Africans who were compelled by force to become the slaves of Europeans and who understood that the “rights of freedom” pertained to them as much as they did to any other man would always be a threat to European colonists.1 Indeed, some West Africans came from a culture where warfare prevailed to the extent that women, ...

read more

Chapter 3: “The Past Is Never Dead”: The Continuity of African and European Warfare Practices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 59-82

Traditions of exterminatory warfare employed by the peoples of Europe and West Africa in their own countries reemerged around the African diaspora over the issue of black freedom and the institution of enslavement. Despite British efforts to control them, Africans who survived the Middle Passage were aggressive in their resistance to enslavement in the West Indies ...

read more

Chapter 4: The Abridgment of Hope: After Nat Turner

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 83-102

Although traditionally Nat Turner’s insurrection in 1831 has been viewed as a momentous event for white Virginians, it was equally traumatic and certainly more transformative for the black community in the slaveholding South. Laws set in place to curtail servile insurrections did not stop the enslaved from continuing to attempt to free themselves. ...

read more

Chapter 5: “In the Hands of the Master”: The Virginia Debates

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-124

When political theorist Alexis de Tocqueville surveyed the southern states of America in 1832, he observed a pervasive sense of “conflict between the white and the black inhabitants of the Southern States of the Union.” He noted that this “danger . . . however remote it may be, is inevitable” and that it “perpetually haunts the imagination of the Americans.” ...

read more

Chapter 6: Would Have to “See His Blood Flow”: Reopening the African Slave Trade

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 125-141

The quest to reopen the African slave trade caused vigorous debate among proslavery southerners in the 1850s. Some politicians were concerned that the reestablishment of the trade would create sectional tensions, perhaps even disunion. The states on the border of the slave South argued that the effects of an increase in the slave population ...

read more

Chapter 7: John Brown’s Mistake: The Power of Memory and the Dangers of Violence

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-174

When white abolitionist John Brown first plotted to terrorize the South, he may have believed that the black community was ready to join him in carrying out his vision of a slave revolt throughout the South. Brown seized the United States Federal Arsenal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia, on October 16, 1859, because for him, ...

read more

Chapter 8: Making “Hell for a Country”: The Civil War and Post–Civil War Era

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 175-200

The Civil War, even in the beginning, was at its heart about blacks in America and the institution of slavery, making the issue of a war between the races more relevant than ever before. South Carolina was the first southern state to secede from the Union, and two of its reasons for withdrawing from the Union stand out: ...

read more

Epilogue: The “Place for Which Our Fathers Sighed”

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-212

When James Weldon Johnson, principal of the segregated Stanton grammar school in Florida, wrote the poem “Lift Every Voice and Sing” to introduce Booker T. Washington during his visit there in 1900, he eloquently linked the past with the present, our present. Quickly transformed into song by his brother John Rosemond Johnson ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-214

This book is the manifestation of a long and serious effort to understand racial violence in America. I want to thank all of the wonderful scholars at Rutgers University who encouraged and supported me: Suzanne Lebsock, Nancy Hewitt, Mia Bay, and my outside reader, Walter Johnson. I also want to thank Carolyn Brown, Ann Fabian, Jan Lewis, Donna Murch, ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 215-268

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-281