Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

ABBREVIATIONS OF WORKS CITED

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pp. ix-xi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

Modern academic philosophy has often been criticized for losing its original inspiration in struggling with first order questions that torment and haunt the human spirit, questions about why we exist and how we should live confronted by the brevity of life and its seeming meaninglessness.1 Today, students of philosophy are no longer ...

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One - The Aporias of Temporality

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pp. 23-66

Thinkers of all sorts, from scientists to philosophers, have attempted to give a final account of time. Time has been portrayed in a multiplicity of forms, hypostatized in a thousand metaphors, and described through a plethora of symbols. However, when separated from theogonies, genealogies, and mythologies, the human desire to understand ...

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Two - Bergson and Time as Duration

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pp. 67-118

A review of the history of Western philosophy finds the French philosopher Henri Bergson (1859–1941) a curious anomaly. Almost 60 years after his death, Bergson’s works have yet to be definitively assimilated into one movement or school.1 Their originality and style have prevented them from being eclipsed and forgotten. ...

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Three - Merleau-Ponty and Temporality

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pp. 119-178

Upon close reading, one sees that Bergson’s ideas cast a long shadow over much of Merleau-Ponty’s thinking, even though the latter is understood to have been typically influenced by Husserl.1 Like Bergson, Merleau-Ponty’s thought begins with a critique of science and rationalism. In fact, there is some truth to the argument that ...

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Four - The Historical Presentand Narrative Identity

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pp. 179-227

For Bergson, a specifically human time was differentiated from ordinary time by concentrating on the immediate data of consciousness; his thesis was decisively psychological. By way of intuition, Bergson thought he had discovered a characteristic of human existence (pure duration) that could not be determined by empirical science ...

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Five - Creative Time

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pp. 228-255

This chapter consolidates the tripartite theme of time, self, and meaning by looking for the points of convergence and divergence throughout the thought of Bergson, Merleau-Ponty, and Ricoeur. The aim here is not to work toward a specific model but, rather, to understand how the three themes hold each other together in a ...

Notes

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pp. 256-282

Bibliography

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pp. 283-294

Index

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pp. 295-299