In this Book

Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination
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Study of self-consciousness in Hegel and Shakespeare. In this fascinating book, Jennifer Ann Bates examines shapes of self-consciousness and their roles in the tricky interface between reality and drama. Shakespeare’s plots and characters are used to shed light on Hegelian dialectic, and Hegel’s philosophical works on art and politics are used to shed light on Shakespeare’s dramas. Bates focuses on moral imagination and on how interpretations of drama and history constrain it. For example: how much luck and necessity drive a character’s actions? Would Coriolanus be a better example than Antigone in Hegel’s account of the Kinship-State conflict? What disorients us and makes us morally stuck? The sovereign self, the moral pragmatics of wit, and the relationship between law, tragedy, and comedy are among the multifaceted considerations examined in this incisive work. Along the way, Bates traces the development of deleterious concepts such as fate, anti-Aufhebung, crime, evil, and hypocrisy, as well as helpful concepts such as wonder, judgment, forgiveness, and justice.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page
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  1. Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-ix
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xi-xx
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xxi-xxii
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. xxiii-xxiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
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  1. Part I. Sublations in Tragedy and Comedy
  2. p. 21
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  1. 1. A Hegelian Reading of Good and Bad Luck in Shakespeare an Drama
  2. pp. 23-35
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  1. 2. Tearing the Fabric: Hegel's Antigone, Shakespeare's Coriolanus,and Kinship-State Conflict
  2. pp. 37-53
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  1. 3. Aufhebung and Anti-Aufhebung: Geist and Ghosts in Hamlet
  2. pp. 55-84
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  1. 4. The Problem of Genius in King Lear: Hegel on the Feeling Soul and the Tragedy of Wonder
  2. pp. 85-111
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  1. Part II. Ethical Life and the History Plays: The Development of Negative Infinite Judgment and the Limits of the Sovereign Self
  2. pp. 113-117
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  1. Section 1. Sovereign Alienation and the Development of Wit (Chapters 5 and 6)
  2. p. 119
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  1. 5. Richard II's Mirror and the Alienation of the Universal Will (of the "I"; that Is a "We")
  2. pp. 121-136
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  1. 6. Falstaff and the Politics of Wit Negative Infinite Judgment in a Culture of Alienation
  2. pp. 137-156
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  1. Section 2. Sovereign Deceit and the Rejection of Wit (Chapters 7, 8, and 9)
  2. pp. 157-182
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  1. 8. Hegel's Theory of Crime and Evil: (Re)tracing the Rights of the Sovereign Self
  2. pp. 183-199
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  1. 9. Richard III, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Henry V: Conscience, Hypocrisy, Self-Deceit and the Tragedy of Ethical Life
  2. pp. 201-221
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  1. Section 3. Sovereign Wit and the End of Alienation (Chapter 10)
  2. pp. 223-224
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  1. 10. Negation of the Negative Infinite Judgment vs. Sublation of It: Punishment vs. Pardon in The Philosophy of Right and Henry VIII
  2. pp. 225-245
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  1. Part III. Universal Wit: The Romance Plays and Absolute Knowing
  2. pp. 247-248
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  1. 11. Universal Wit—The Absolute Theater of Identity
  2. pp. 249-270
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  1. 12. Absolute Infections and their Cure
  2. pp. 271-291
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 293-358
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 359-367
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 369-378
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