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Essential History
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summary
However widely and differently Jacques Derrida may be viewed as a "foundational" French thinker, the most basic questions concerning his work still remain unanswered: Is Derrida a friend of reason, or philosophy, or rather the most radical of skeptics? Are language related themes writing, semiosis his central concern, or does he really write about something else? And does his thought form a system of its own, or does it primarily consist of commentaries on individual texts? This book seeks to address these questions by returning to what it claims is essential history: the development of Derrida's core thought through his engagement with Husserlian phenomenology. Joshua Kates recasts what has come to be known as the Derrida/Husserl debate, by approaching Derrida's thought historically, through its development. Based on this developmental work, Essential History culminates by offering discrete interpretations of Derrida's two book length 1967 texts, interpretations that elucidate the until now largely opaque relation of Derrida's interest in language to his focus on philosophical concerns.

Table of Contents

  1. Contents
  2. p. ix
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. p. xi
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  1. List of Abbreviations of Works by Jacques Derrida
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xv-xxix
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  1. 1. The Success of Deconstruction: Derrida, Rorty, Gasch
  2. pp. 3-31
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  1. 2. “A Consistent Problematic of Writing and the Trace”: The Debate in Derrida/Husserl Studies and the Problem of Derrida’s Development
  2. pp. 32-52
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  1. 3. Derrida’s 1962 Interpretation of Writing and Truth: Writing in the “Introduction” to Husserl’s Origin of Geometry
  2. pp. 53-82
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  1. 4. The Development of Deconstruction as a Whole and the Role of Le probl
  2. pp. 83-114
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  1. 5. Husserl’s Circuit of Expression and the Phenomenological Voice in Speech and Phenomena
  2. pp. 115-157
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  1. 6. Essential History: Derrida’s Reading of Saussure, and His Reworking of Heideggerean History
  2. pp. 158-217
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 219-296
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 297-305
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 307-318
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