Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xvi

Trying to confine the diversity of a people’s musical practices in one book, even ten, is a daunting and perhaps even impossible task. As an outsider to that culture, it is even more difficult to convey the wealth of information of tonal as well as gestural symbolism, especially through the medium of words. This is, however, the task I undertook when, due to serious illness, ...

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1. Aawambo People in Namibia: History and Musical Heritage

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pp. 1-23

It is amazing how music tells the history of a culture!
In my explorations into some of the distinctive musical sounds of Aawambo (lit. the-people-with-the-cattle-outposts), interesting aspects of history were revealed. Music confirms much of the known history, but in a most colourful and authentic manner. ...

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2. The Work We Do: Performing Daily Lives

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pp. 24-35

It is a part of human life that people have to work to survive. Whether in contemporary life or traditional, there is always work!
In Aawambo traditional life there are several performances that are not really thought of as music. To the outsider it would sound as though a song is being sung, but they are not called songs (iiyimbo) in Oshiwambo. ...

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3. Praise and Endurance: What Men Value

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pp. 36-52

From the discussion in Chapter 1, the musical world of Oshiwambo-speaking people can be seen to show a clear differentiation between men’s and women’s music. This could be the outcome of traditional labour divisions between genders. Nowadays, where women have entered the labour market in many areas previously reserved for men, ...

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4. New from Old: Women and their Weddings

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pp. 53-82

For generations Aawambo women have sung when they work, when they play, when they soothe children, when they worship, but most importantly, when they participate in their most meaningful coming-of-age ceremony, the “traditional wedding” or olufuko.1 ...

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5. Moonlight Play: Teaching Old, Developing New

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pp. 83-101

I am sitting on a large overturned can, preparing my video equipment. I am waiting for the children outside the palisades at meme Esther’s place at Uukwamatsi, Ongandjera in 1999. It is late harvest (cool dry) season, and the late afternoon sun is pleasant on my back. While the breeze rustles gently through the dry mahangu stalks, ...

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6. Myths & Metaphors: the Enduring Magic of Stories

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pp. 102-120

Stories! What a vital part of human cultures across the world. Stories (omahokololo) are an integral part of religions and education. They have multiple overt purposes, the most important of which are to act as moral guidelines, to entertain, to remember events and people of historical importance. Hence, stories are often metaphors of real life situations or potential. ...

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7. Urban Oshiwambo Music: Hybrid Realities

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pp. 121-132

A topic never previously tackled or published in Namibia is that of contemporary developments in the urban or young music of Oshiwambo-speakers. Some years ago, in the late Nineties, a question was put to me at an international conference: “What is the township music vibe in Windhoek?” ...

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8. An Aawambo Musical World: a Theoretical Position

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pp. 133-143

In order to place the preceding information within a theoretical framework, the following analysis serves as a basis. Cultural analysis is, however, a political minefield since many traditions might be “invented” through social and political interventions. Yet one can feel the inner calling of the existence of a sound and value-based system, ...

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9. A Collection of Aawambo Songs

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pp. 144-161

The songs contained in this chapter are but a few selected from the many hundreds of songs known to Aawambo. Their inclusion here is to provide a sample for readers of music notation. The notations were originally transcribed by me in a pulse line notation, which I find easier and more accurate for the inclusion of non-Western tonalities, especially for movements. ...

Abbreviations

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p. 162

List of Illustrations

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p. 162

Glossary of Performance-related Terms Gathered during Field Research

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pp. 163-177

Bibliography

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pp. 177-181

Index

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pp. 182-188

Back Cover

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