Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Contributors

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgements and preface

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pp. ix-x

This book presents findings of the Research Council of Norway-funded project 'Flows and Practices: The Politics of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Africa'. We are grateful to the Research Council of Norway for their generous financial support. ...

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1. Introduction – Flows and Practices: The Politics of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Eastern and Southern Africa

Lyla Mehta, Synne Movik, Alex Bolding, Bill Derman, Emmanuel Manzungu

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pp. 1-29

For the past two decades, IWRM has been actively promoted by water experts as well as multilateral and bilateral donors who have considered it to be a crucial way to address global water management problems. IWRM has been incorporated into water laws, reforms and policies of southern African nations. This chapter provides a conceptual framework to study: the flow of IWRM as an idea; ...

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2. The Birth and Spread of IWRM – A Case Study of Global Policy Diffusion and Translation

Jeremy Allouche

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pp. 30-56

How did the idea of IWRM emerge at the global level? Why has IWRM become so popular and so resilient, at least in discourse and policy? What has caused IWRM policies to diffuse across time and space? The principal goal of this chapter is to identify a set of concepts and mechanisms to study the global diffusion and translation of IWRM through coercion, ...

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3. The Flow of IWRM in SADC: The Role of Regional Dynamics, Advocacy Networks and External Actors

Synne Movik, Lyla Mehta, Emmanuel Manzungu

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pp. 57-84

This chapter explores the entry and spread of IWRM in the Eastern and Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. It traces how the idea of IWRM was promoted and sustained throughout the region by mapping key events, actors and networks that were involved in promoting the approach. ...

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4. Emergence, Interpretations and Translations of IWRM in South Africa

Synne Movik, Lyla Mehta, Barbara van Koppen, Kristi Denby

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pp. 85-106

South Africa is often regarded to be at the forefront of water reform, based on Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) ideas. This chapter explores how the idea of IWRM emerged in South Africa, its key debates and interpretations and how it has been translated. ...

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5. The ‘Trickle Down’ of Integrated Water Resources Management: A Case Study of Local-Level Realities in the Inkomati Water Management Area, South Africa

Kristi Denby, Synne Movik, Lyla Mehta, Barbara van Koppen

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pp. 107-131

The historical legacy in South Africa of apartheid and the resulting discriminatory policies and power imbalances are critical to understanding how water is managed and allocated, and how people participate in designated water governance structures. The progressive post-apartheid National Water Act (NWA) is the principal legal instrument related to water governance ...

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6. Surges and Ebbs: National Politics and International Influence in the Formulation and Implementation of IWRM in Zimbabwe

Emmanuel Manzungu, Bill Derman

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pp. 132-156

In the 1990s, the Government of Zimbabwe undertook water reforms to redress racially defined inequitable access to agricultural water. This chapter analyses how a water reform process, seemingly informed by a clear political economy objective, was hijacked by efforts directed at implementing Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). ...

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7. The Complex Politics of Water and Power in Zimbabwe: IWRM in the Catchment Councils of Manyame, Mazowe and Sanyati (1993-2001)

Bill Derman, Emmanuel Manzungu

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pp. 157-179

In the mid-nineties Zimbabwe formed participatory institutions known as catchment and sub-catchment councils based on river basins to govern and manage its waters. These councils were initially funded by a range of donors anticipating that they could become self-funding over time through the sale of water. ...

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8. Land, Farming and IWRM: A Case Study of the Middle Manyame Sub-Catchment

Takunda Hove, Bill Derman, Emmanuel Manzungu

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pp. 180-201

Zimbabwe’s water reforms that were undertaken in the 1990s were meant to redress the colonially inherited inequalities to agricultural water, increase water security against frequent droughts, improve water management, and realise sustainable financing of the water sector. They were underpinned by the 1998 Water and Zimbabwe National Water Authority Acts, ...

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9. IWRM Avant la Lettre? Four Key Episodes in the Policy Articulation of IWRM in Downstream Mozambique

Rossella Alba, Alex Bolding

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pp. 202-226

The first substantive piece of water legislation ever adopted in Mozambique, the Lei de Águas of 1991, was crafted before IWRM (Integrated Water Resources Management) was endorsed as the newly emerging global consensus on water governance. Yet, the Lei de Águas already incorporated the river basin concept and its decentralised water management, making Mozambique a case of IWRM ...

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10. The Politics of Water Payments and Stakeholder Participation in the Limpopo River Basin, Mozambique

Rossella Alba, Alex Bolding, Raphaëlle Ducrot

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pp. 227-250

Drawing from the experience of the Limpopo River Basin in Mozambique, the chapter analyses the articulation of a water rights framework in the context of decentralised river basin governance and IWRM-inspired reforms. The nexus between financial autonomy, service provision, stakeholder participation and the resultant allocation of water within the river basin ...

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11. Winners and Losers of IWRM in Tanzania

Barbara van Koppen, Andrew K.P. R. Tarimo, Aurelia van Eeden, Emmanuel Manzungu and Philip Mathew Sumuni

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pp. 251-276

This chapter focuses on the application of the concept of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) in Tanzania. It asks: how did IWRM affect the rural and fast-growing majority of smallholder farmers’ access to water which contributes directly to poverty alleviation and employment creation in a country where poverty and joblessness are high? ...

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12. Whose Waters? Large-Scale Agricultural Development and Water Grabbing in the Wami-Ruvu River Basin, Tanzania

Aurelia van Eeden, Lyla Mehta, Barbara van Koppen

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pp. 277-300

In Tanzania like in other parts of the global South, in the name of ‘development’ and ‘poverty eradication’ vast tracts of land have been earmarked by the government to be developed by investors for different commercial agricultural projects, giving rise to the contested land grab phenomenon. In parallel, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) has been promoted in the country ...

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13. IWRM in Uganda – Progress after Decades of Implementation

Alan Nicol, William Odinga

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pp. 301-321

Uganda lies almost wholly within the Nile Basin and is a country characterised as well-endowed with water resources. Receiving considerable inflows of aid since the early 1990s, some of this aid emerging after the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro enabled the country to begin a process of Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), taking the lead from Chapter 18 of Agenda 21. ...

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14. Reflections on the Formulation and Implementation of IWRM in Southern Africa from a Gender Perspective

Bill Derman, Preetha Prabhakaran

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pp. 322-344

While it is claimed that the founding principles of integrated water resources management are the Dublin Principles this does not appear to be the case for Principle No. 3, which underlines the importance of women in water provision, management and safeguarding. Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania and Zimbabwe are members of SADC and have signed the SADC Protocol ...

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15. Viewpoint – IWRM and I: A Reflexive Travelogue of the Flows and Practices Research Team

Alex Bolding, Rossella Alba

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pp. 345-367

This viewpoint chapter critically discusses how IWRM travelled to each of the researchers of the Flows and Practices team, through which networks they personally engaged with IWRM, what opportunities the IWRM saga offered these researchers and how they tried to translate the concept and policy idea of IWRM into something more aligned with their concerns. ...

Back Cover

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