Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

Numerous people—mentors, colleagues, administrators, archivists, friends, and family—have supported and enabled my work over many years. Without them, and the strong women who stood up to and against dominant patriarchal structures and to whom this book is dedicated, this project would not have been possible. ...

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Introduction: Engendering the Archive

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pp. 1-24

On July 15, 1878, in San Diego, California, the author María Amparo Ruiz de Burton penned a letter to the eminent historian Hubert Howe Bancroft. At the time, the historian was crafting his extensive History of California (1884–89) project, alongside another text, California Pastoral (1888). The History of California project included testimonios from nearly one hundred Californios ...

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1. Mexican American Women’s Alternative Archive: Linking Testimonio, Memory, and History

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pp. 25-49

The history of dispossession in the U.S. Southwest cannot be told without reference to the impact that the U.S. legal system of the nineteenth century had on communities throughout New Mexico, California, Texas, and Arizona. Borderlands historians have contributed invaluable information about how the United States used the now historic 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ...

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2. Testimonio in the Writings of María Amparo Ruiz de Burton

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pp. 50-69

In a dramatic opening scene in her first novel, Who Would Have Thought It? (1872), María Amparo Ruiz de Burton introduces Doña María Theresa Almenara de Medina—the daughter of an elite Mexican don who had been captured by Sonoran Indians in California in 1846. Dr. James Norval, a prominent geologist, finds Doña Theresa, ...

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3. Jovita González Stakes a Claim in Tejas History

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pp. 70-100

The 1930s were memorable years in the United States, and in Texas in particular, as they were marked by the impact of the Great Depression and by economic shifts for those whose livelihoods depended on an agrarian lifestyle bound to change after the devastating drought that led to the Dust Bowl (1934–37), ...

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4. The Not So “New” Mexico: Struggle for Land, Identity, and Agency

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pp. 101-126

As the preceding chapters indicate, women in New Mexico, California, and Texas deliberately made their voices heard as they entered into the public arena, whether through the U.S. legal or educational systems or through their determination to chronicle the stories of their people through their testimonios. ...

Conclusion: Negotiating Fragmented Subjectivities from Within the Archive

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pp. 127-134

Notes

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pp. 135-148

Works Cited

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pp. 149-158

Index

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pp. 159-169