Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This book would not have been possible without the good faith and encouragement of an entire community of colleagues, friends, and family. I have looked forward to writing these pages to express my thanks for quite some time.
The book—and I as a scholar—benefited immeasurably from the guidance of Jim Lebovic, Kimberly Morgan, Michael Barnett, and Aisling Swaine. They always seemed to know which rabbit holes were worth exploring and which were best left alone. Martha Finnemore,...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-24

The haunting stories of sexual violence in war are by now too familiar. Several hundred thousand women and girls suffered sexual violence in Berlin in 1945 at the close of World War II. Mass rapes and sexualized violence against people of all ages and genders attended the street riots and internments during the Holocaust. Rape was considered heinous but inevitable and therefore insufficient to warrant formal prosecution on its own grounds at the Nuremberg Trials (Henry 2011, 30–34)....

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1 Defining the Weapon: Sexual Violence as a Security Issue

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pp. 25-60

The broad acceptance and diffusion of the “weapon of war” frame has created a paradox for advocates wishing to shed light on and end sexual and gender-based violence in its myriad forms: The frame gets states and international organizations to take sexual violence seriously as an issue of peace and security; but, by the same token, it limits the range of possible political, humanitarian, and legal responses by focusing on strategic sexual violence....

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2 “Her Story Is Far Too Common”: The US Response to Sexual Violence in the DRC

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pp. 61-90

Condemnation of an armed group or regime for the use of rape, especially as a weapon of war or a tactic of political repression against women and children, is now one of the most powerful tools in the policymaker’s or advocate’s rhetorical toolbox. Precisely because advocacy efforts to highlight sexual violence have been so successful, waging a campaign of systematic rape against civilians is viewed as one of the most callous and barbaric forms of warfare. Condemnation may not follow exclusively...

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3 A Security Concern: Sexual Violence and UN Security Council Resolution 1820

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pp. 91-120

On June 19, 2008, representatives of the member states of the United Nations Security Council rose to speak about their governments’ condemnation of wartime sexual violence and the threat that this particular weapon of war poses, not only to the civilian women and girls who make up the majority of victims but also to international peace, security, and stability. The fact that every member of the Security Council and a host of UN member states would one day rise in support of a...

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4 Expanding the Agenda: PSVI and State-Led Advocacy

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pp. 121-157

On May 29, 2012, British foreign secretary William Hague announced the launching of his government’s effort to combat sexual violence in war, the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative (PSVI). In his public comments on PSVI, Hague often cited the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war in Srebrenica and Darfur and referred to “chilling reports” of rape in Syria (Foreign and Commonwealth Office 2012a). In the first of his many speeches that conveyed a deep personal, moral...

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5 The Legacy of the “Weapon of War” Frame: Implications for Research, Policy, and Practice

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pp. 158-181

To return to the question I posed at the outset of the book: What impact has the “weapon of war” frame had on international political efforts to end conflict-related sexual violence? Specifically, how has this dominant frame helped or hindered efforts to implement an anti–sexual violence agenda? The previous three chapters offered case studies demonstrating how advocates’ use of the “weapon of war” frame persuaded state leaders and members of the UN Security Council to view sexual violence as...

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Conclusion

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pp. 182-190

The international community cannot stand back and applaud its success in ending the problem of conflict-related sexual violence just yet, as there is much work that remains if the ultimate goal is to change the daily lives of real people—of all ages, genders, and identities—by assisting survivors and truly deterring would-be perpetrators. At the same time, we must also pause ever so briefly to reflect on the progress that advocates working both within and outside states and organizations...

References

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pp. 191-204

Index

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pp. 205-214