Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, In Memoriam

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Maps

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p. viii

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Foreword

Holger H. Herwig

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pp. ix-xii

In the preface to his book, Lossberg casually states: “During the Great War I served as the chief of staff of German combat formations nine times in an uninterrupted sequence.” Those assignments included, in succession, the XIII Württemberg Corps; German Fifth, Sixth and Ninth Armies; division chief in the Army Supreme Command (OHL); chief of staff of Third, Second, ...

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Translators’ Introduction

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pp. xii-xxvi

Few officers in the twentieth century have had as much influence on the development of modern tactics as Friedrich (“Fritz”) Karl von Lossberg. Known in the German Army of World War I as der Abwehrlöwe—the Lion of the Defensive—he played a key role in developing and proving on the battlefield many of the principles and techniques modern armies to this day ...

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Lossberg’s 1939 Prologue

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pp. 3-4

After twelve years of troop assignments in the 2nd Foot Guards Regiment, I served in General Staff assignments at all echelons prior to the start the war. This General Staff time was only interrupted by my assignments as a company commander, an instructor at the Prussian War Academy, and a battalion commander. ...

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1. Chief of Staff of the XIII Army Corps

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pp. 5-122

On 1 October 1913, I was assigned as the chief of the General Staff of the XIII (Royal Württemberg) Army Corps, commanded by General of the Infantry Hermann Gustav Karl Max von Fabeck. The corps consisted of the 26th Division, commanded by Lieutenant General Wilhelm Karl Florestan Gero Crescentius, Herzog von Urach, Graf von Württemberg, and the 27th Division, ...

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2. Division Chief of the General Staff of the Supreme Command of the Field Army (OHL)

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pp. 123-166

In the afternoon of 6 January, I reported to the chief of the General Staff of the Field Army, Lieutenant General Erich von Falkenhayn, at Mézières.1 I already knew him during peacetime. During the years 1900 through 1903, when von Falkenhayn as a major was an advisor to the Chinese Army, we lived in the same building as his family, who had remained in Karlsruhe. ...

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3. Chief of the General Staff of the Third Army (Champagne, 1915)

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pp. 167-206

During the car trip from Mézières to the Third Army headquarters at Vouziers, I made an action plan for my new assignment. My decision was based on an iron resolve to hold the new positions created by the enemy’s break-in (Einbruch) and to fight for every inch of ground. A voluntary withdrawal (Ausweichen) was completely contrary to my approach ...

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4. Chief of the General Staff of the Second Army (The Somme, 1916)

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pp. 207-224

By the time I arrived at the Second Army headquarters in Saint-Quentin on 3 July 1916 shortly after 0500 hours, my predecessor, Major General Paul Grünert, had already departed. The senior General Staff officer, Major Faupel, briefed me on the previous conduct of the battle, which he described approximately as follows: ...

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5. Chief of the General Staff of the First Army (The Somme, 1916)

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pp. 225-272

On the morning of 19 July the new First Army headquarters occupied Bourlon. Remaining with the Second Army were Major Faupel, the Ia, and Captain von Bredow, the Ib. Colonel von Redern, who had just been assigned as the assistant chief of staff, moved to the First Army, along with Major von Trotha, the IIa, and some of the more junior officers. ...

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6. Chief of the General Staff of the Sixth Army (Arras, 1917)

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pp. 273-286

On 11 April 1917, I had a long conversation with General von Below about the basics of the defense for the newly redeployed First Army, positioned between the Seventh and Third Armies. At about 1000 hours I got in the staff car to leave for our new army headquarters in Rethel. The motor had already been cranked up when a staff officer came running out of the building ...

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7. Chief of the General Staff of the Fourth Army (Flanders, 1917)

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pp. 287-350

On the morning of 13 June, I drove in a staff car from Tournai to the Fourth Army headquarters at Courtrai, Belgium. I reported immediately to the commanding general, General of Infantry Friedrich Sixt von Armin, who received me very warmly. As the commanding general of the IV Army Corps, General Sixt von Armin twice ...

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8. Chief of the General Staff of Army Group Boehn

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pp. 351-360

When I arrived at Avesnes-les-Aubert, General Ludendorff made a rather depressing impression on me. He immediately informed me that I had been appointed as the chief of staff of the newly organized Army Group Boehn, which consisted of the Second, Eighteenth, and Ninth Armies. He then briefed me on the map about the current situation. ...

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9. Chief of the General Staff of Army Group Duke Albrecht of Württemberg

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pp. 361-364

After my arrival in Strasbourg, I reported on 1 November 1918 directly to the commanding general. I had previously in peacetime served with Duke Albrecht when he was commanding general of the XIII Württemberg Army Corps. During the course of the war I ran into him several times at OHL meetings. The army group staff was very well established. ...

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10. After the War

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pp. 365-366

Upon my arrival in Stuttgart virtually only red flags were flying. I could not help myself thinking that our military honor and the freedom of our German Fatherland had broken down. I nonetheless decided to devote my full strength to saving Germany. ...

Appendix A. Lossberg’s Chronology

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pp. 367-368

Appendix B. Lossberg’s Medals and Decorations

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pp. 369-370

Appendix C. The Prussian/German Staff System, 1806–1918

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pp. 371-378

Notes

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pp. 379-402

Index of Military Units

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pp. 403-419

Subject Index

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pp. 420-444

Photographs

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