Cover

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Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

The invention of this book was a long process and one that I could not have completed without the help of many people. My  own thinking about medieval invention began more than a decade ago in the graduate program at the Pennsylvania State University, and I am especially grateful to Robert R. Edwards for his mentorship over the years, ...

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Introduction: The Emergence of Invention

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pp. 1-35

This book examines the process of poetic invention as it is conceptualized and expressed in the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer and John Gower. Specifically, it examines how these poets present invention as an affective force, a  process characterized by emergence and potentiality, and one that has a corollary in affect—that is, a  kind of force or sensation distinct from emotion, ...

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Chapter 1. "Gooth Yet Alway Under": Invention as Movement in the House of Fame

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pp. 36-68

In the introduction I argued that the critical vocabulary of movement, emergence, and becoming that is typically used to describe phenomena of affect can also be used to describe medieval concepts of poetic invention, specifically the movements and sensations of emergence that precede more formal compositional activity. ...

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Chapter 2. "Ryght Swich as Ye Felten": Aligning Affect and Invention in The Legend of Good Women

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pp. 69-92

In the previous chapter, I argued that the House of Fame represents poetic invention in terms of movement by drawing on medieval commonplaces about imagination as a component of medieval faculty psychology that itself emphasizes movement, and then literalizing in the tydynge-house of Book 3 a process ...

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Chapter 3. A Thing So Strange: Macrocosmic Emergence in the Confessio Amantis

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pp. 93-121

I suggested at the end of Chapter 2 that in the Confessio Amantis, Gower develops to a much fuller extent than Chaucer the ways in which exploring the relationship between affective and inventional movements can be used to imagine widespread cultural rejuvenation. In  the next two chapters, I  trace how Gower’s poem develops this project. ...

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Chapter 4. "The Cronique of this Fable": Transformative Poetry and the Chronicle Form in the Confessio Amantis

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pp. 122-150

In the previous chapter, I argued that the Confessio works to figuratively represent movements of affect and invention within its narratives and that it begins to imagine how the productive potential that characterizes such movements might actually impinge upon the social “reality” external to the Confessio itself. ...

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Chapter 5. Empty Songs, Mighty Men, and a Startled Chicken: Satirizing the Affect of Invention in Fragment VII of the Canterbury Tales

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pp. 151-190

I argued in the final section of the previous chapter that Gower essentially satirizes the model of chronicle invention he establishes in the Confessio, and that Book 5’s self-conscious critique works alongside the chronicles of invention in Book 4 as part of a larger program of imagining poetry’s productive potential. ...

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Conclusion: From Ashes Ancient Come: Affective Intertextuality in Chaucer, Gower, and Shakespeare

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pp. 191-212

Throughout this book I have worked to show how Chaucer and Gower conceptualize affect and poetic invention in terms of each other: specifically, how the movements and energies that precede the formal, prescriptive actions of poetic composition parallel similar movements, shifts, and sensations of potential that precede the collapse of affect into emotion. ...

Bibliography

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pp. 213-226

Index

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pp. 227-234

Other Titles in the Series

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Back Cover

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