Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Haunted City never would have taken shape without my dissertation advisor, Rebecca Schneider, who nurtured this project from its larval stages to its present form. I also owe many thanks to the members of my dissertation committee—John Emigh, Patricia Ybarra, and Heather Nathans—who shared invaluable feedback on my research at crucial points in its development. LeAnn Fields, Christopher Dreyer, and Elizabeth Frazier at the University of Michigan Press—along with the anonymous readers of my manuscript—have suggested numerous improvements to the clarity and...

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

read more

One. Haunted City

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-25

In 2002 my wife, Caitlin, and I rented a one-bedroom row house on a treeless alley near the corner of Seventh and Wharton Streets in South Philadelphia. Two blocks from us, the city stopped. Vacant lots strewn with rubble stretched eastward along Wharton from Fifth Street to Moyamensing Avenue, where rows of houses suddenly sprang up again. This was Pennsport, a traditionally Irish Catholic neighborhood with neat, lace-curtain homes (most of them tiny, like ours) and a cluster of venerated mummers’ clubhouses along Second Street. To an erstwhile Californian like me, this was a mysterious...

read more

Two. Orientalism, Blackness, and Femininity in the Meschianza and Slaves in Algiers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 26-57

On the afternoon of May 18, 1778, four hundred British officers and elite Philadelphians embarked on a grand regatta down the Delaware River to Walnut Grove, an estate just south of the city. This aquatic procession kicked off the Meschianza, an extravagant, all-night party given to honor General William Howe and his brother, Admiral Richard Howe, on their departure from North America. At the Meschianza (which derives its name from mescolanza, the Italian word for “mixture” or “medley”), the young, marriageable daughters of Philadelphia’s colonial elite appeared in Turkish...

read more

Three. Life in Philadelphia: Racial Caricature in Graphic Art and Performance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-85

On January 3, 1799, Philadelphia diarist Elizabeth Drinker remarked on the fine clothes her two black servants had recently worn to a wedding:

Jacob dress[ed] in a light cloth coat, white cashmere vest and britches, white silk Stockings and a new hat. Sarah, the bridesmaid, [dressed] in white muslin...with white ribbons from head to foot, yellow Morocco shoes with white bows, &c. They went in Benjamin Oliver’s coach, [driven] by his white man....They are both honest servants, but times [are] much altered with the black folk.1...

read more

Four. Parade Time: Colonel Pluck, Bobalition, and Minstrel Remains

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-116

Susan G. Davis, Mary P. Ryan, David Glassberg, and Brooks McNamara (among others) have documented the American infatuation with parades, pageants, and other sorts of public celebrations in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but the spatiotemporal form of the American parade has received little scholarly attention.1 I begin this chapter by drawing creatively on Gertrude Stein’s paean to the Americanness of cowboys, movies, and detective stories in order to theorize what I call parade time, a concept that can be fruitfully applied to the historiography of parade performances...

read more

Five. The Minstrel Wench and the Mummers Wench: A Performance Genealogy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-142

In December 1963, under pressure from civil rights activists, the city of Philadelphia banned blackface makeup from the Mummers Parade. To protest the ban, a group of white mummers staged a sit-in that briefly halted the 1964 procession up Broad Street. As mummers historian Charles E. Welch Jr. recalls it,

Members of the H. Philip Hammond Comic Club sat down in the middle of the street, some shouting, “Negroes sat down in City Hall, we’ll sit down here.” A new chant started: “One, two, three,...

read more

Conclusion: Carnival, the Public Sphere, and Performance in Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-150

On New Year’s Day 1995 the Philadelphia Department of Recreation moved thousands of reluctant mummers from Broad Street to a new, downtown parade route wending past many of the city’s most famous tourist attractions. In Max Raab’s film Strut, a 2001 documentary on the Mummers Parade, mummer Ed Kirlin describes how he and the other members of the Froggy Carr Wench Brigade responded to this change. On the way to their starting position, Kirlin and his seven hundred white, male, cross-dressed confederates

had to go through a really ritzy neighborhood, and apparently lots of guys were stopping to pee,...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 151-178

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-188