Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Books often have convoluted origin stories. This book began some time back in the early 1990s on rural roads in central Illinois guarded by tall corn and much shorter soybeans. Thousands of miles of suffering in silence, through wind, rain, heat, and snow with the same small group of people, gave me plenty of time to wonder about the world in unusual ways. Though it took many years to return to technology and sport, I have always been interested in the pair...

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Introduction. Sports, Bodies, and Technoscience

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pp. 1-28

“It’s the motor, not the machine.” As a competitive cyclist in the late 1980s through the mid-1990s, I came to speak this phrase regularly. It became a familiar mantra that my compatriots and I would systematically repeat. Put simply, this saying means that one’s body—the motor—is vastly more important than any technoscientific device, pharmaceutical treatment, or psychological conditioning in the final outcome of a cycling race. In hindsight, I repeated this phrase to others and myself out of my...

Part One: Judging Artifacts

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pp. 29-30

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1. Black Is the New Fast: Swimsuit Technoscience and the Recalibration of Elite Swimming

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pp. 31-66

An impassioned Bob Bowman exclaimed at the 2009 Fédération Internationale de Natation World Championships: “We’ve lost all the history of the sport . . . the sport is in shambles right now and they better do something or they’re going to lose their guy who fills these seats.” His exclamations came after years of controversy around the design of swimsuits and reconfirmed that swimming had become enveloped in an absurd and surreal technoscientific world. That “guy who fills these seats” was...

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2. Gearing Up for the Game: Equipment as a Shaper of Sport

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pp. 67-99

In contemporary sport, equipment is central. Whether it is uniforms, shoes, gloves, bats, balls, or other more complex devices, all athletes play with or use some form of technoscientific gear. Sport governing bodies have a vested interest in managing the use of technoscientific equipment that challenges a sport’s cherished versions of authenticity. But publics, athletes, and equipment manufacturers are equally invested in similar forms of authenticity. These investments can make entire sporting...

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3. Disabled, Superabled, or Normal? Oscar Pistorius and Physical Augmentation

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pp. 100-128

When South African sprinter Oscar Pistorius stepped onto the track at the Olympic Park stadium in the East London district of Stratford to run in a 400 m qualifier on the morning of August  4, 2012, he made history—again.1 He became the first visibly disabled athlete to compete in a track event during the modern Olympic era.2 Pistorius made it all the way to the semifinals, and by all accounts this was a success on multiple levels. His last place semifinal finish precluded him from....

Part Two: Evaluating Bodies

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pp. 129-130

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4. “I Know One When I See One”: Sport and Sex Identification in an Age of Gender Mutability

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pp. 131-153

On the evening of August 11, 2012, Caster Semenya made a late race charge on the final straightaway to win the silver medal in the women’s 800 m race at the 2012 London Summer Olympics. The twenty-one-year-old athlete had captured her first Olympic medal, but the road to the final would be littered with social roadblocks and cultural potholes. Raised in the northern South African city of Fairlie, in the province of Limpopo, Semenya showed an affinity for athletics from an early age. She excelled at...

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5. The Parable of a Cancer Jesus: Lance Armstrong and the Failure of Direct Drug Testing

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pp. 154-177

On June 12, 2012, the United States Anti-Doping Agency formally charged Lance Armstrong, Johan Bruyneel, Pedro Celaya, Luis Garcia del Moral, Michele Ferrari, and Pepe Marti with anti-doping rule violations. The charges purported that all six men provided medical or management support for the United States Postal Service, Discovery Channel, Astana, and RadioShack cycling teams during the years Lance Armstrong was a member. The USADA contended that it possessed evidence proving that...

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6. “May I See Your Passport?” The Athlete Biological Passport as a Technology of Control

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pp. 178-204

The proliferation of performance-enhancing drugs has put professional sport under an uncomfortable microscope. In recent years, Major League Baseball has struggled to manage the public perception of its game in light of drug usage attributed to high-profile players such as Jose Canseco, Mark McGwire, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Alex Rodriguez, and Ryan Braun, to name a few.1 In the Italian Series A soccer league, the Juventus Football Club has been accused of administering erythropoietin to...

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Conclusion. Body, Motor, Machine: The Future of Technology and Sport

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pp. 205-222

We love champions. We especially love sport champions. We love heroes. We especially love to make athletic success heroic. This love readily conflates heroism and athletic success. The heroic champions we love most are those who have worked the hardest and sacrificed nearly everything to achieve the highest heights of success. Winning a sporting competition always carries a level of status, and athletes can drive themselves to unhealthy and irrational lengths to win and be loved. The apocryphal legend...

Notes

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pp. 223-254

Index

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pp. 255-262